November 6, 2015

JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University.

JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 1 of 19 COURSE DESCRIPTION Whether you’re running a restaurant or a bank, business comes down to the efficient delivery of highquality goods and services to the customer. To get things done, you need a laser-like focus on operations. This course explores such topics as process mapping, capacity analysis, operations design, quality improvement, inventory and supply chain management, Six Sigma and lean operations techniques, forecasting and planning, and sustainability. INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS Required Resources Heizer, J. & Render, B. (2014). Operations management ( 11th ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall Welch, J. (2005). Winning. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. Cases and articles are provided within the course. COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES 1. Describe how operations management can strategically create a competitive advantage within an industry. 2. Identify process strategies and process types and explain their significance. 3. Analyze process flows, process capacity, and time performance in order to calculate process economics and recommend improvements. 4. Explain the impact of TPS and Lean on operations management. 5. Explain the impact of Six Sigma on operations management. 6. Explain the strategic importance of product design in operations management. 7. Describe the role of inventory and supply chain management strategies in operations management. 8. Describe how outsourcing supports overall strategy. 9. Apply operations management strategies to increase competitive advantage. 10. Describe how the bullwhip effect can influence supply chain functions. 11. Use technology and information resources to research issues in operations management. 12. Write clearly and concisely about operations management using proper writing mechanics. JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 2 of 19 CONTACT INFORMATION FOR PROBLEMS OR ISSUES • Have a curriculum-related question? Contact your instructor for assistance. • Have a technology-related question? Contact JWMI Tech Support at (888) 596-5964 x3 or techsupport@jwmi.com. • Have a student services-related question? Contact Student Services at (703) 561-2128 or stusupport@jwmi.com. JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 3 of 19 WEEKLY COURSE SCHEDULE This 4.5 credit-hour Masters-level course is designed with the goal of having each student spend 10-15 hours (13.5 hours on average) in weekly work. This includes preparation, activities, discussions, and assignments; live or online; individual or in groups. Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 1 Introduction to Operations Management Preparation  Introduction to the OM Course Project: OM as a Competitive Advantage in Your Organization  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 1: Operations and Productivity − Heizer & Render, Chapter 2: Operations Strategy in a Global Environment  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “What is Operations Management?” Activities  Introductions  Lecture  Discussion: Operations as Strategy  Learning Journal Evaluation  None JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 4 of 19 Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 2 Process Strategy and Types of Processes Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 7: Process Strategy − Garvin, “Types of Processes”  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “OM as a Competitive Advantage” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Types of Processes  Learning Journal Evaluation • None 3 Mapping and Analyzing Process Flows Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 7s: Capacity and Constraint Management − Grey & Leonard, “Process Fundamentals” − Landel & Snyder, “Business Process Mapping” − Landel & Snyder, “Business Process Mapping: The Darden School Mailroom”  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “Getting Voices” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Develop and Analyze Process Maps  Learning Journal Evaluation  None JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 5 of 19 Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 4 Lean Operations Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 16: JIT, TPS, and Lean Operations − Swank, “The Lean Service Machine” − Netland & Ferdows, ”What to Expect from a Corporate Lean Program” − Spear & Bowen, “Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System” (HBR OnPoint Enhanced Edition, Hardpont, Jan 2006) − HBR Case Study, “Implementing LEAN Operations at Caesars Casinos”  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “Getting Voices” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Lean Operations in Your Organization  Learning Journal Evaluation  Assignment 1: Caesars Casinos Case Study (Weight: 20%) JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 6 of 19 Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 5 Quality and Six Sigma Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 6: Managing Quality − Welch, Chapter 15: Six Sigma − Welch, “Six Sigma Shotgun” − Bottome & Chua, “Genentech Error Proofs Its Batch Records” − McDonald, “Using Lean Six Sigma to Improve Hospital Based, Outpatient Imaging Satisfaction” − Riley, Kovach and Carden, “Developing a Policies and Procedures Manual for a Consumer Lending Department: A Design for Six Sigma Case Study”  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “Six Sigma” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Applying Six Sigma  Learning Journal Evaluation  OM Course Project Outline due -1 page (Weight 3%) 6 Product Design Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 5: Design of Goods and Services − Brown, “Design Thinking” − Bettencourt & Bettencourt, “Innovating On the Cheap” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Product Design in Operations Management  Learning Journal Evaluation  None JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 7 of 19 Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 7 Inventory & Supply Chain Management Preparation  Readings − Heizer & Render, Chapter 11: Supply Chain Management − Heizer & Render, Chapter 12: Inventory Management − Narayanan & Raman, “Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains” − Chopra & Lariviere, “Managing Service Inventory to Improve Performance” − HBR Case Study, “Domino’s Pizza” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Inventory and Supply Chain Management in Your Organization  Learning Journal Evaluation  Assignment 2: Domino’s case study (Weight: 20%) 8 Outsourcing Preparation  Readings − Ricart & Adegbesan, “The Offshoring of High-Value Services and the Globalization of Capability Sourcing” − Pearce, “Why domestic outsourcing is leading America’s reemergence in global manufacturing”  Media − Video: Jack Welch “Outsourcing” Activities  Lecture  Discussion: The Value of Outsourcing  Learning Journal Evaluation  None JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 8 of 19 Week Preparation, Activities, and Evaluation 9 Application of Operations Management for Competitive Advantage Preparation  Media − Video: MegaFactories Guinness Beer or MegaFactories Rolls Royce (National Geographic YouTube Channel) Activities  Lecture  Discussion: MegaFactories Video  Learning Journal Evaluation  OM Course Project: OM as a Competitive Advantage in Your Organization due (Weight: 25%) 10 Supply Chain Simulation Preparation • Readings: − Lee, Padmanabhan & Whang, “The Bullwhip Effect in Supply Chains”  Media − Video: Jack Welch, “Impact of the Internet” − Video: Jack Welch, “Cultural Impacts on OM” − Video: Jack Welch, “Operations in Tough Times”  Other − Root Beer Game: You will participate in the Root Beer Game. You will receive information from your instructor about your role. Activities  Lecture  Discussion: Root Beer Game  Learning Journal: Your Learning Inventory Evaluation  None 11 Activities  Learning Journal JWI 550: Operations Management Course Guide ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 9 of 19 GRADING SCALE – GRADUATE Assignment % of Grade Assignment 1: Caesars Casinos Case Study 20% Assignment 2: Dominos Pizza Case Study 20% OM Course Project Outline 3% OM Course Project: OM as a Competitive Advantage in Your Organization 22% Participation: Discussions 30% Participation: Learning Journal 5% Total 100% JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 10 of 19 Assignment 1: Case Study – Caesars Casinos Due Week 4, Day 7 (Weight: 20%) Lean operations are used to improve processes in a wide variety of industries, not just manufacturing. Organizations worldwide are using Lean to eliminate waste, reduce inventory, increase throughput, and provide better customer service. As a result, improved operations are positively impacting the bottom line. For this assignment, you’ll read and analyze a case study about a Lean implementation at Caesars Casinos. Then, you’ll write a 6-8 page paper that describes how challenges were handled during the process, your own proposal for a similar kaizen event, and your recommendation for a Lean implementation. Answer the following questions about the Caesars Casinos case study: 1. Describe two challenges that Caesars experienced during the Lean implementation process. What actions were taken to overcome each challenge? Were they effective? 2. Assume you manage hotel housekeeping at Harrah’s Metropolis location, and service scores have declined over the past year. As part of the Lean rollout, you and some of your front-line employees will participate in a kaizen event focused on improving guest-room housekeeping operations. • What KPIs (key performance indicators) would you propose to track to determine whether the changes implemented through the kaizen effort actually improve performance? Explain your choice of KPIs. • Develop a detailed agenda for this kaizen event. Your agenda should outline the event’s activities, timing, duration, and Lean tools. Explain your rationale for each agenda item. 3. At the end of the case study, Caesars’ SVP/GM Brad Hirsch is faced with a choice between two process improvement approaches, expert-driven or employee-centered. • What would be the advantages and disadvantages of an expert-driven approach to process improvement at the Metropolis facility, in contrast to the employee-centered approach used at Tunica? • Which approach would you recommend for the Metropolis facility, and why? Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: • Be typed and double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12) with one-inch margins on all sides; references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required page length. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 11 of 19 Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic/organization of the paper, and language and writing skills, using the following grading criteria. Weight: 20% Assignment 1: Case Study – Caesars Casinos Criteria Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors 1. Describe two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. Weight: 20% Did not submit or incompletely described two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. Partially described two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. Satisfactorily described two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. Completely described two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. Exemplarily described two Lean implementation challenges that Caesars experienced and the actions taken to overcome each challenge. 2. Develop KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. Weight: 35% Did not submit or incompletely developed KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. Partially developed KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. Satisfactorily developed KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. Completely developed KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. Exemplarily developed KPIs and a detailed agenda, including a supporting rationale, for a kaizen event. 3. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. Weight: 35% Did not submit or incompletely described the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. Partially described the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. Satisfactorily described the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. Completely described the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. Exemplarily described the advantages and disadvantages of two process improvement approaches, and recommend one process improvement approach with a supporting rationale. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 12 of 19 Weight: 20% Assignment 1: Case Study – Caesars Casinos Criteria Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors 4. Clarity, logic, and writing mechanics. Weight: 10% Multiple mechanical errors; much of the text is difficult to understand or the text does not flow; fails to follow formatting instructions. Several mechanical errors make parts of the text difficult for the reader to understand; the text does not flow; the discussion fails to justify conclusions and assertions. Partially applied concepts from across the course. More than a few mechanical errors; text flows but lacks conciseness or clarity; assertions and conclusions are generally justified and explained. Few mechanical errors; text flows and concisely and clearly expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. None to limited minor mechanical errors; text flows and concisely, clearly, and exemplarily expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 13 of 19 Assignment 2: Case Study – Domino’s Due Week 7, Day 7 (Weight: 20%) Supply chain management enables companies to work with suppliers to obtain materials needed to produce their own goods and services. Effectively managing supply chains helps companies streamline processes, cut costs, and maximize profits. For this assignment, you’ll read and analyze a case study about Domino’s supply chain management. In a 6-8 page paper, you’ll identify how Domino’s uses its supply chain to gain a competitive advantage. You’ll examine how the supply chain creates value and how it is impacted when a company changes it focus. Lastly, you’ll provide a recommendation on whether Domino’s should apply its U.S. supply chain model to an expanding international operation. Answer the following questions about the Domino’s case study: 1. Describe how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. 2. What did increased transparency do for Domino’s? Were the risks worthwhile? 3. How did the centralized supply chain model enable Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S.? 4. Should John Macksood apply Domino’s domestic supply chain model to its expanding international operations? Explain and justify your recommendation, including its financial impact. Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: • Be typed and double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12) with one-inch margins on all sides; references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required page length. Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic/organization of the paper, and language and writing skills, using the following grading criteria. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 14 of 19 Weight: 20% Assignment 2: Case Study – Domino’s Criteria Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors 1. Describe how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. Weight: 20% Did not submit or incompletely described how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. Partially described how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. Satisfactorily described how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. Completely described how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. Exemplarily described how Domino’s supply chain creates value to provide a competitive advantage. 2. Explain how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. Weight: 20% Did not submit or incompletely explained how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. Partially explained how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. Satisfactorily explained how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. Completely explained how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. Exemplarily explained how increased transparency impacted Domino’s, and if the risks were worthwhile. 3. Explain how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. Weight: 25% Did not submit or incompletely explained how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. Partially explained how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. Satisfactorily explained how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. Completely explained how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. Exemplarily explained how the centralized supply chain model enabled Domino’s to roll out new pizza recipes in the U.S. 4. Recommend and justify whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. Weight: 25% Did not submit or incompletely recommended and justified whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. Partially recommended and justified whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. Satisfactorily recommended and justified whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. Completely recommended and justified whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. Exemplarily recommended and justified whether or not the Domino’s domestic supply chain model should be applied internationally. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 15 of 19 Weight: 20% Assignment 2: Case Study – Domino’s Criteria Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors 5. Clarity, logic, and writing mechanics. Weight: 10% Multiple mechanical errors; much of the text is difficult to understand or the text does not flow; fails to follow formatting instructions. Several mechanical errors make parts of the text difficult for the reader to understand; the text does not flow; the discussion fails to justify conclusions and assertions. Partially applied concepts from across the course. More than a few mechanical errors; text flows but lacks conciseness or clarity; assertions and conclusions are generally justified and explained. Few mechanical errors; text flows and concisely and clearly expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. None to limited minor mechanical errors; text flows and concisely, clearly, and exemplarily expresses the student’s position in a manner that rationally and logically develops the topics. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 16 of 19 OM Course Project: OM as a Competitive Advantage in Your Organization Due Week 9, Day 7 (Weight: 25%) This project will help you synthesize and apply what you have learned in the Operations Management course to your organization. Keep in mind you will analyze your organization from a leadership perspective. You will assess your organization through a competitive priority lens and evaluate the ten OM decision areas and key processes to develop actionable recommendations to increase your company’s competitive advantage. This should be a 7-9 page paper. Choose an organization (current or past) and complete the following: 1. Describe the operations and key processes of your organization. Describe current-state processes using the following business process maps: • SIPOC, and • Detailed process flowchart, swim-lane process map, or value-stream map 2. Describe the competitive priorities of your organization and the product-process strategies used. As a result, what are the key tasks that senior management should focus on doing especially well? o Hint: Compete on differentiation, cost and/or response? Process focus, repetitive focus, product focus, or mass customization focus? 3. Refer to the Ten Strategic OM Decisions (page 8, Heizer & Render): 1. Design of goods and services 2. Managing quality 3. Process and capacity design 4. Location strategy 5. Layout strategy 6. Human resources and job design 7. Supply-chain management 8. Inventory management 9. Scheduling 10. Maintenance Describe how each of the ten OM decision areas is currently addressed. • 3 – 5 sentences/bullets for each area Evaluate the decisions made in each of the ten OM decision areas: • Do they align with the organization’s competitive priorities and product-process strategies? Explain why or why not. 4. What specific, actionable recommendations would you present to your company’s senior management to improve operations for competitive advantage? Provide a rationale for all recommendations, and consider the following hints: • Would you present any changes to competitive priorities and/or product-process strategies? • How would you address any of the ten OM decisions differently? JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 17 of 19 • Would you change any processes? Highlight any changes and include a future state process map. • What is the timeline for your recommended actions? Your assignment must follow these formatting requirements: • Be typed and double-spaced, using Times New Roman font (size 12) with one-inch margins on all sides; references must follow APA or school-specific format. Check with your professor for any additional instructions. • Include a cover page containing the title of the assignment, the student’s name, the professor’s name, the course title, and the date. The cover page and the reference page are not included in the required page length. Grading for this assignment will be based on answer quality, logic/organization of the paper, and language and writing skills, using the following grading criteria. JWI 550: Operations Management Academic Submissions and Evaluations ©2015 Strayer University. All Rights Reserved. This document contains Strayer University confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, further distributed, or otherwise disclosed, in whole or in part, without the expressed written permission of Strayer University. This course guide is subject to change based on the needs of the class. JWMI 550 Course Guide – Fall 2015 Page 18 of 19 Weight: 25% OM Course Project: OM as a Competitive Advantage in Your Organization Criteria Unsatisfactory Low Pass Pass High Pass Honors 1. Describe the operations and key processes of your organization. Weight: 20% Did not submit or incompletely described the operations and key processes of the organization. Partially described the operations and key processes of the organization. Satisfactorily described the operations and key processes of the organization. Completely described the operations and key processes of the organization. Exemplarily described the operations and key processes of the organization . 2. Describe the competitive priorities, current product-process strategies, and key management tasks of your organization. Weight: 20% Did not submit or incompletely described the competitive priorities, current product-process strategies, and key management tasks of the organization. Partially described the competitive priorities, current product-process strategies, and key management tasks of the organization. Satisfactorily described the competitive priorities, current product-process strategies, and key management tasks of the organization. Completely described the competitive priorities, current productprocess strategies, and key management tasks of the organization. Exemplarily described the co

November 6, 2015

4/22/2014

November 6, 2015

Assembly Language Programming

X86-64 Assembly Language Programming with Ubuntu Ed Jorgensen Version 1.0.10 September 2015 Cover image: AMD Opteron, the first CPU to introduce the x86-64 extensions in 2003. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AMD_Opteron_146_Venus,_2005.jpg Cover background: By Benjamint444 (Own work) Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ASwirly_belt444.jpg Copyright © 2015 by Ed Jorgensen You are free: to Share — to copy, distribute and transmit the work to Remix — to adapt the work Under the following conditions: Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). Noncommercial — You may not use this work for commercial purposes. Share Alike — If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. Table of Contents Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………1 1.1 Prerequisites……………………………………………………………………………………………..1 1.2 What is Assembly Language……………………………………………………………………….2 1.3 Why Learn Assembly Language………………………………………………………………….2 1.3.1 Gain a Better Understanding of Architecture Issues………………………………..3 1.3.1 Understanding the Tool Chain………………………………………………………………3 1.3.1 Improve Algorithm Development Skills………………………………………………..3 1.3.1 Improves Understanding of Functions/Procedures………………………………….3 1.3.1 Gain an Understanding of I/O Buffering………………………………………………..4 1.3.1 Understand Compiler Scope…………………………………………………………………4 1.3.1 Introduction to Multi-processing Concepts…………………………………………….4 1.3.1 Introduction to Interrupt Processing Concepts………………………………………..4 1.4 Additional References………………………………………………………………………………..4 1.4.1 Ubuntu References……………………………………………………………………………..5 1.4.2 BASH Command Line References………………………………………………………..5 1.4.3 Architecture References……………………………………………………………………….5 1.4.4 Tool Chain References…………………………………………………………………………5 1.4.4.1 YASM References………………………………………………………………………..6 1.4.4.2 DDD Debugger References…………………………………………………………..6 2.0 Architecture Overview………………………………………………………………………………….7 2.1 Architecture Overview……………………………………………………………………………….7 2.2 Data Storage Sizes……………………………………………………………………………………..8 2.3 Central Processing Unit………………………………………………………………………………9 2.3.1 CPU Registers………………………………………………………………………………….10 2.3.1.1 General Purpose Registers (GPRs)……………………………………………….10 2.3.1.2 Stack Pointer Register (RSP)……………………………………………………….12 2.3.1.3 Base Pointer Register (RBP)………………………………………………………..12 2.3.1.4 Instruction Pointer Register (RIP)………………………………………………..12 2.3.1.5 Flag Register (rFlags)…………………………………………………………………12 2.3.1.6 XMM Registers………………………………………………………………………….13 2.3.2 Cache Memory…………………………………………………………………………………14 2.4 Main Memory………………………………………………………………………………………….16 2.5 Memory Layout……………………………………………………………………………………….17 Page iii Table of Contents 2.6 CPU Registers…………………………………………………………………………………………17 2.6.1 General Purpose Registers (GPRs)………………………………………………………18 2.6.2 Stack Pointer Register (RSP)………………………………………………………………20 2.6.3 Base Pointer Register (RBP)………………………………………………………………20 2.6.4 Instruction Pointer Register (RIP)……………………………………………………….20 2.6.5 Flag Register (rFlags)………………………………………………………………………..20 2.6.6 XMM Registers………………………………………………………………………………..21 2.7 Memory Hierarchy…………………………………………………………………………………..22 2.8 Exercises…………………………………………………………………………………………………24 2.8.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………………24 3.0 Data Representation…………………………………………………………………………………..27 3.1 Integer Representation………………………………………………………………………………27 3.1.1 Two’s Compliment…………………………………………………………………………….29 3.1.2 Byte Example…………………………………………………………………………………..29 3.1.3 Word Example………………………………………………………………………………….30 3.2 Unsigned and Signed Addition…………………………………………………………………..30 3.3 Floating-point Representation……………………………………………………………………30 3.3.1 IEEE 32-bit Representation………………………………………………………………..31 3.3.1.1 IEEE 32-bit Representation Examples………………………………………….32 3.3.1.1.1 Example → 7.7510……………………………………………………………..32 3.3.1.1.2 Example → 0.12510……………………………………………………………32 3.3.1.1.3 Example → 4144000016……………………………………………………..33 3.3.2 IEEE 64-bit Representation………………………………………………………………..33 3.3.3 Not a Number (NaN)…………………………………………………………………………33 3.4 Characters and Strings………………………………………………………………………………34 3.4.1 Character Representation……………………………………………………………………34 3.4.1.1 American Standard Code for Information Interchange…………………….34 3.4.1.2 Unicode…………………………………………………………………………………….35 3.4.2 String Representation………………………………………………………………………..35 3.5 Exercises…………………………………………………………………………………………………35 3.5.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………………36 4.0 Program Format………………………………………………………………………………………..39 4.1 Comments……………………………………………………………………………………………….39 4.2 Numeric Values……………………………………………………………………………………….39 4.3 Defining Constants…………………………………………………………………………………..40 4.4 Data Section……………………………………………………………………………………………40 4.5 BSS Section…………………………………………………………………………………………….41 Page iv Table of Contents 4.6 Text Section…………………………………………………………………………………………….42 4.7 Example Program…………………………………………………………………………………….43 4.8 Exercises…………………………………………………………………………………………………45 4.8.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………………45 5.0 Tool Chain………………………………………………………………………………………………….47 5.1 Assemble/Link/Load Overview………………………………………………………………….47 5.2 Assembler……………………………………………………………………………………………….49 5.2.1 Assemble Commands………………………………………………………………………..49 5.2.2 List File……………………………………………………………………………………………49 5.2.3 Two-Pass Assembler………………………………………………………………………….51 5.2.3.1 First Pass…………………………………………………………………………………..52 5.2.3.2 Second Pass……………………………………………………………………………….52 5.2.4 Assembler Directives…………………………………………………………………………53 5.3 Linker…………………………………………………………………………………………………….53 5.3.1 Linking Multiple Files……………………………………………………………………….54 5.3.2 Linking Process………………………………………………………………………………..54 5.3.3 Dynamic Linking………………………………………………………………………………56 5.4 Assemble/Link Script……………………………………………………………………………….56 5.5 Loader…………………………………………………………………………………………………….58 5.6 Debugger………………………………………………………………………………………………..58 5.7 Exercises…………………………………………………………………………………………………59 5.7.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………………59 6.0 DDD Debugger…………………………………………………………………………………………..61 6.1 Starting DDD…………………………………………………………………………………………..61 6.1.1 DDD Configuration Settings………………………………………………………………63 6.2 Program Execution with DDD…………………………………………………………………..63 6.2.1 Setting Breakpoints…………………………………………………………………………..63 6.2.2 Executing Programs…………………………………………………………………………..64 6.2.2.1 Run / Continue…………………………………………………………………………..66 6.2.2.2 Next / Step………………………………………………………………………………..66 6.2.3 Displaying Register Contents……………………………………………………………..66 6.2.4 DDD/GDB Commands Summary……………………………………………………….68 6.2.4.1 DDD/GDB Commands, Examples……………………………………………….70 6.2.5 Displaying Stack Contents…………………………………………………………………71 6.2.6 Debugger Commands File (interactive)……………………………………………….71 6.2.6.1 Debugger Commands File (non-interactive)………………………………….72 6.2.6.2 Debugger Commands File (non-interactive)………………………………….73 Page v Table of Contents 6.3 Exercises…………………………………………………………………………………………………73 6.3.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………………73 6.3.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………….74 7.0 Instruction Set Overview…………………………………………………………………………….77 7.1 Notational Conventions…………………………………………………………………………….77 7.1.1 Operand Notation……………………………………………………………………………..78 7.2 Data Movement……………………………………………………………………………………….79 7.3 Addresses vs Values…………………………………………………………………………………81 7.4 Conversion Instructions…………………………………………………………………………….82 7.4.1 Narrowing Conversions……………………………………………………………………..82 7.4.2 Widening Conversions……………………………………………………………………….82 7.4.2.1 Unsigned Conversions………………………………………………………………..83 7.4.2.2 Signed Conversions……………………………………………………………………84 7.5 Integer Arithmetic Instructions…………………………………………………………………..86 7.5.1 Addition…………………………………………………………………………………………..86 7.5.1.1 Addition with Carry……………………………………………………………………89 7.5.2 Subtraction……………………………………………………………………………………….92 7.5.3 Integer Multiplication………………………………………………………………………..95 7.5.3.1 Unsigned Multiplication……………………………………………………………..95 7.5.3.2 Signed Multiplication…………………………………………………………………98 7.5.4 Integer Division………………………………………………………………………………102 7.6 Logical Instructions………………………………………………………………………………..108 7.6.1 Logical Operations………………………………………………………………………….109 7.6.2 Shift Operations………………………………………………………………………………110 7.6.2.1 Logical Shift…………………………………………………………………………….110 7.6.2.2 Arithmetic Shift………………………………………………………………………..112 7.6.3 Rotate Operations……………………………………………………………………………114 7.7 Control Instructions………………………………………………………………………………..115 7.7.1 Labels…………………………………………………………………………………………….115 7.7.2 Unconditional Control Instructions……………………………………………………116 7.7.3 Conditional Control Instructions……………………………………………………….116 7.7.3.1 Jump Out Of Range………………………………………………………………….119 7.7.4 Iteration………………………………………………………………………………………….122 7.8 Example Program, Sum of Squares…………………………………………………………..124 7.9 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………….125 7.9.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………….125 7.9.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………..129 Page vi Table of Contents 8.0 Addressing Modes…………………………………………………………………………………….133 8.1 Addresses vs Values……………………………………………………………………………….133 8.1.1 Register Mode Addressing……………………………………………………………….134 8.1.2 Immediate Mode Addressing…………………………………………………………….134 8.1.3 Memory Mode Addressing……………………………………………………………….135 8.2 Example Program, List Summation………………………………………………………….138 8.3 Example Program, Pyramid Areas and Volumes…………………………………………139 8.4 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………….144 8.4.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………….145 8.4.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………..148 9.0 Process Stack……………………………………………………………………………………………151 9.1 Stack Example……………………………………………………………………………………….151 9.2 Stack Instructions…………………………………………………………………………………..152 9.3 Stack Implementation……………………………………………………………………………..153 9.3.1 Stack Layout…………………………………………………………………………………..154 9.3.2 Stack Operations……………………………………………………………………………..155 9.4 Stack Example……………………………………………………………………………………….157 9.5 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………….158 9.5.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………….159 9.5.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………..160 10.0 Program Development…………………………………………………………………………….161 10.1 Understand the Problem………………………………………………………………………..161 10.2 Create the Algorithm…………………………………………………………………………….162 10.3 Implement the Program…………………………………………………………………………164 10.4 Test/Debug the Program………………………………………………………………………..166 10.5 Error Terminology………………………………………………………………………………..167 10.5.1 Assembler Error…………………………………………………………………………….167 10.5.2 Run-time Error………………………………………………………………………………168 10.5.3 Logic Error…………………………………………………………………………………..168 10.6 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..168 10.6.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..168 10.6.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………169 11.0 Macros……………………………………………………………………………………………………171 11.1 Single-Line Macros………………………………………………………………………………171 11.2 Multi-Line Macros……………………………………………………………………………….172 11.2.1 Macro Definition…………………………………………………………………………..172 11.2.2 Using a Macros……………………………………………………………………………..173 Page vii Table of Contents 11.3 Macro Example……………………………………………………………………………………173 11.4 Debugging Macros……………………………………………………………………………….175 11.5 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..176 11.5.1 Quiz Questions………………………………………………………………………………176 11.5.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………176 12.0 Functions………………………………………………………………………………………………..177 12.1 Stack Dynamic Local Variables……………………………………………………………..177 12.2 Function Declaration…………………………………………………………………………….178 12.3 Standard Calling Convention…………………………………………………………………178 12.4 Linkage……………………………………………………………………………………………….179 12.5 Argument Transmission…………………………………………………………………………180 12.6 Calling Convention………………………………………………………………………………180 12.6.1 Parameters Passing………………………………………………………………………..181 12.6.2 Register Usage………………………………………………………………………………182 12.6.3 Call Frame……………………………………………………………………………………183 12.6.3.1 Red Zone……………………………………………………………………………….185 12.7 Example, Statistical Function 1 (leaf)……………………………………………………..185 12.7.1 Caller…………………………………………………………………………………………..186 12.7.2 Callee…………………………………………………………………………………………..186 12.8 Example, Statistical Function2 (non-leaf)………………………………………………..188 12.8.1 Caller…………………………………………………………………………………………..188 12.8.2 Callee…………………………………………………………………………………………..189 12.9 Stack-Based Local Variables………………………………………………………………….193 12.10 Summary…………………………………………………………………………………………..196 12.11 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………197 12.11.1 Quiz Questions…………………………………………………………………………….197 12.11.2 Suggested Projects……………………………………………………………………….199 13.0 System Services………………………………………………………………………………………203 13.1 Calling System Services………………………………………………………………………..203 13.2 Newline Character………………………………………………………………………………..204 13.3 Console Output…………………………………………………………………………………….205 13.3.1 Example, Console Output……………………………………………………………….206 13.4 Console Input………………………………………………………………………………………209 13.4.1 Example, Console Input…………………………………………………………………210 13.5 File Open Operations……………………………………………………………………………214 13.5.1 File Open……………………………………………………………………………………..215 13.5.2 File Open/Create……………………………………………………………………………216 Page viii Table of Contents 13.6 File Read…………………………………………………………………………………………….217 13.7 File Write…………………………………………………………………………………………….217 13.8 File Operations Examples……………………………………………………………………..218 13.8.1 Example, File Write……………………………………………………………………….218 13.8.2 Example, File Read……………………………………………………………………….224 13.9 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..230 13.9.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..230 13.9.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………231 14.0 Multiple Source Files………………………………………………………………………………233 14.1 Extern Statement………………………………………………………………………………….233 14.2 Example, Sum and Average……………………………………………………………………234 14.2.1 Assembly Main……………………………………………………………………………..234 14.2.2 Function Source…………………………………………………………………………….236 14.2.3 Assemble and Link………………………………………………………………………..238 14.3 Interfacing with a High-Level Language…………………………………………………238 14.3.1 Example, C++ Main / Assembly Function………………………………………..238 14.3.2 Compile, Assemble, and Link…………………………………………………………240 14.4 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..241 14.4.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..241 14.4.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………241 15.0 Stack Buffer Overflow…………………………………………………………………………….243 15.1 Understanding a Stack Buffer Overflow………………………………………………….244 15.2 Code to Inject………………………………………………………………………………………245 15.3 Code Injection……………………………………………………………………………………..248 15.4 Code Injection Protections…………………………………………………………………….249 15.4.1 Data Stack Smashing Protector (or Canaries)……………………………………249 15.4.2 Data Execution Prevention……………………………………………………………..250 15.4.3 Data Address Space Layout Randomization……………………………………..250 15.5 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..250 15.5.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..250 15.5.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………251 16.0 Command Line Arguments……………………………………………………………………..253 16.1 Parsing Command Line Arguments………………………………………………………..253 16.2 High-Level Language Example……………………………………………………………..254 16.3 Argument Count and Argument Vector Table…………………………………………..255 16.4 Assembly Language Example………………………………………………………………..256 16.5 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..260 Page ix Table of Contents 16.5.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..260 16.5.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………261 17.0 Input/Output Buffering…………………………………………………………………………..263 17.1 Why Buffer………………………………………………………………………………………….263 17.2 Buffering Algorithm……………………………………………………………………………..265 17.3 Exercises……………………………………………………………………………………………..268 17.3.1 Quiz Questions……………………………………………………………………………..268 17.3.2 Suggested Projects…………………………………………………………………………269 18.0 Floating Point Instructions………………………………………………………………………271 18.1 Floating Point Values……………………………………………………………………………271 18.2 Floating Point Registers………………………………………………………………………..271 18.3 Data Movement……………………………………………………………………………………272 18.4 Integer / Floating Point Conversion Instructions………………………………………274 18.5 Floating Point Arithmetic Instructions…………………………………………………….276 18.5.1 Floating Point Addition………………………………………………………………….276 18.5.2 Floating Point Subtraction………………………………………………………………278 18.5.3 Floating Point Multiplication………………………………………………………….279 18.5.4 Floating Point Division…………………………………………………………………..281 18.5.5 Floating Point Square Root…………………………………………………………….283 18.6 Floating Point Control Instructions…………………………………………………………285 18.6.1 Floating Point Comparison……………………………………………………………..286 18.7 Floating Point Calling Conventions………………………………………………………..289 18.8 Example Program, Sum and Average…………………………………………â€

November 6, 2015

Games Programming

Core Spikes Introduction This document is an overview of the Spikes available in this subject. What is a Spike? A Spike is a small project designed to close, through research & implementation, a knowledge or skill gap. The emphasis here is on the small – you should only do what you need to close (and demonstrate that you have closed) the skill gap. Each Spike consists of a Spike Report and a deliverable. The deliverable is usually a code piece, but can be a research report (or, occasionally, both). If the deliverable is a research report, the research report is a separate document to the Spike Report – you must submit both reports. The Spike Report is a report that details the work you have done to complete the spike. A template for this report is available on blackboard. All of the spikes below are compulsory. Completing them is required to get a Pass. Doing these spikes to a high degree of quality and doing additional spikes from the Non-Cores Spike list (see Blackboard) is required to get a Credit. Distinction and High Distinction require a Credit level of work plus a project and a research project, respectively. These spikes broken up into Streams to indicate Spikes that have common themes. All Streams and Spikes in this document must be completed to get a passing grade, Stream 1: How to do C++ work & Game Loops Description: This stream of spikes is designed to familiarise you with the programing language and IDE you will be using for the rest of the semester. Spikes: *Spike 1: Simple Game Loop *Spike 2: IDE Experience & Comparison *Spike 3: Debugger Use *Spike 4: Non-Blocking Game Loops Spike 1: Simple Game Loop CORE SPIKE Context: Games are commonly driven by some form of game loop. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is not familiar with basic game loops. Goals/Deliverables: You need to create the “GridWorld” game, as described in a simple specification document available below. The game will demonstrate the use of a simple game loop, separation of update/render code, and game data (both for the world map and players current location). You will need to deliver the following items: 1. A simple paper-based plan for your code design. (Yes, a simple functional design is fine – just as long as you can demonstrate that you planned first before coding!) 2. Create a simple console program that implements the “GridWorld” game using a simple game loop. The game must demonstrate the separation of: a. processing of input (text commands from the player), b. updating of a game model (where the player is and their options), c. display (output current location and options) of the game to the user. 3. Spike Outcome Report. Note: The Spike Outcome Report is always a required “deliverable”. It will not be repeated in future spike requirements as it is assumed. Recommendations:  Read the “GridWorld” game details and on paper (as required in the deliverables) do a quick sketch/design of how you will organise your code. (No formal standard specified… just use something that would work to help you explain your design to another programmer)  Look at the Spike Outcome Report template – note what you need to record for later.  Use an IDE for C/C++ development that you already know. (We’ll look at some others later so don’t get distracted from the main point of this spike!)  Begin small, test often. Use simple printouts to check values (or the debugger if you already know that and are comfortable). Don’t try fancy debugging yet if you don’t know it – that’s a later spike if it’s something you need to work out. Stay on target! Tips:  Consider a DEBUG macro condition if extra code is needed for testing purposes.  You do not need to show the “map” or the current player location – but it is useful.  If you find some useful resources that helped you to get your code working, then remember to note them down and include them in your spike outcome report. Google, books, blogs, classmates, etc. all go in the spike report.  Have a plan for when you present your outcomes to the tutor. (They will probably say something like “Right – show me”… and it’s up to you to show-off what you’ve done.)  Many of these tips also apply to spikes in general and are not exclusive to this spike. DO NOT  Make things any more complicated than you need – just get it working.  Create complex data-structures. A simple 2D array is fine (and expected).  Add all the fancy features you can think of! Save ideas for later and perhaps develop them as a portfolio item. (You should still document/note them down though.)  Load the map data from a file. Simply hard code the map data. Spike ILOs Design: LOW (1) Implementation: MEDIUM (2) Maintenance: – (0) Performance: – (0) Spike 2: IDE Experience & Comparison CORE SPIKE Context: There are many IDE tools available and developers need to be able to make informed decisions in order to be productive with the tools they select. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is not familiar with different IDE development tools. Goals/Deliverables: [SPIKE REPORT] + [COMPARISON REPORT] 1. Using the simple command line program from Spike 1 create a working project using three of the following IDEs: a. Microsoft Visual Studio 2010/2012/2013 (any version) b. Code::Blocks c. Eclipse+CDT d. XCode e. Netbeans (for C/C++ development) 2. Create a short report to document your findings. (Note: the short report is NOT the spike report – you should have two reports for this spike.) Include the following details: a. For each IDE, a point-form list of the steps required to create a new project in the IDE, add new files, compile and run a command line program. b. For each IDE, a point-form list of the steps required to create a break-point location in the program, and run the program in using the IDE’s integrated debugging system so that program execution stops at the nominated point. c. For each IDE, note how to inspect the value of variables during debugging. d. A comparison matrix (table) to represent the qualities of each IDE (you must decide what criteria you think is important) and your rating (value). e. Clearly state which IDE you will use in future and support your decision. Recommendations:  Start with the IDE that you know first (which you probably used for Spike 1). If you don’t know any, we suggest Visual Studio or whatever your friends can help you with.  Assume you are writing steps to help a colleague to create a project in the IDE.  As a review, show your steps with some other students. Make sure your notes make enough sense! Update any suggestions or omissions so that your notes are valuable.  Be sure to note the version numbers of software you use in your spike outcome report.  Move on to the next IDE and repeat the steps, documenting as you go. (Try to complete all the deliverables for each IDE before moving on to the next.)  Remember that spikes should be about the doing the minimum required to close the gap in knowledge or skill (or technology). However if you do not write enough so that someone else would understand, you have not complete to spike work correctly. Note: If you wish compare a different IDE that is not listed you MUST get permission from your tutor first. If you do not, your outcome report will NOT be accepted. Spike ILOs Design: – (0) Implementation: LOW (1) Maintenance: LOW (1) Performance: – (0) Spike 3: Debugger Use CORE SPIKE Context: Effective use of the debugger is essential for isolating and repairing code errors within a non-trivial project of source code. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is not familiar with the use of debugging tools. Goals/Deliverables: [FIXED CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] You need to demonstrate that you have done the following: 1. Downloaded, compiled and run the “spike3” program provided on blackboard in the IDE of your choice. The program contains a number of “bugs”, including a deliberate memory leak. (Memory is allocated, but not de-allocated.) You must discover and fix errors. (You might not find them all!) 2. Use IDE debugging tools to identify memory leaks and other issues. You must document in your spike report the IDE steps you used to do identify bugs. (You are welcome to use screen shots to supplement the written steps you have used. See the planning notes for suggested steps. ) 3. Save the fixed code and included source code comments to document what you changed. Recommendations: 1. Open the program in your IDE of choice provided it supports debugging and ideally “inspection”. The subsequent steps may vary depending on your IDE, but should be similar. a. Add a break point at a point in the source code at a point likely to be the cause of the leak. (If you’re unsure, place one close to the start of the application and step through all of it. This does mean more stepping, but at least you are less likely to skip over the broken code!) b. Compile and run the program in debug mode (or similar in your IDE). c. When the program breaks, step through the program, examining the source code and variables for potential causes of the leak. Note them down. d. Repair any leaks found. Add comments about your victory! Note:  You might not understand all the code provided, but that’s okay! You should still be able to step through the program execution to find some bugs, if not all.  The goal of this spike is not really about fixing the bugs/leak(s), but rather to get you familiar with the process of using the debugger, and to demonstrate its usefulness. Your spike report should not dwell on the nature of the bugs (or your corrections), but rather show that you can effectively use the debugger to solve problems (the spike “gap”). Spike ILOs Design: – (0) Implementation: LOW (1) Maintenance: LOW (1) Performance: – (0) Spike 4: Non-Blocking Game Loops CORE SPIKE Context: The non-blocking game loop is a more sophisticated implementation of the game loop concept. It is the most common form of game loop used by modern games. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is unfamiliar with the non-blocking game loop. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] 1. Create a console program that implements the “Gridworld” game using a non-blocking game loop. The loop must execute continuously, only processing input when it occurs, and only providing output when necessary. The Gridworld game should be implemented with a timer. Recommendations:  The input stream in C++ makes it easy to determine whether input has occurred and act on it if it has – you’ll have to go beyond simply using the >> operator, though. Stream 2: Simple Game Implementation Description: This stream of spikes is designed to give you a practical familiarity with a game engine or game framework of your choice. This stream is implementation focused, with each spike representing the implementation of a different core game engine feature. Spikes: *Spike 5: Game Framework Familiarisation *Spike 6: Initialisation & Feature Detection *Spike 7: Input Handling *Spike 8: 2D Drawing *Spike 9: Sound Spike 5: Game Framework Familiarisation CORE SPIKE Context: The next series of spikes will use a framework of your choosing – this is your chance to get to know it. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to familiarise themselves with the advantages and disadvantages of their chosen framework. Goals/Deliverables: [SHORT REPORT] + [SPIKE REPORT] In preparation for the use of your framework 1. investigate and present a short report that clearly documents the overall structure of your chosen framework, 2. list a number of previous/current applications that use your chosen framework 3. formally list (comparison table?) the advantages and disadvantages of your chosen framework against a list of criteria that you define OR provide a comparison against another framework for a number of criteria you define. Recommendations: • You are expected to include a reference list/bibliography • You are expected to do more than a simple first look at Wikipedia or the website for your framework. • After your initial web-search research, select a few good quality sources that you could easily reference • Collect general information needed to fulfil the report requirements. • When evaluating new technologies it is good practice to select and define clear criteria. • Methodically apply your comparison criteria. Try to go beyond simple yes/no criteria! • Give full credit to any sources that you use • Clear your chosen framework with your tutor before you start Spike 6: Initialisation & Feature Detection CORE SPIKE Context: Game frameworks provide an easy way for developers to avoid writing and testing lowlevel code for games, however libraries and resources need to be initialised and used the right way before the fun can begin. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to create a program using their chosen framework, show a window of a specified size and to detect and initialise a range of subsystems ready for use. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Create a simple application that creates a drawable window of size 600 wide by 800 high, and will close in response to an exit message (provided by the framework when the user presses Close [or Alt+F4, or Ctrl+Q, etc.]). You should also initialise at minimum the sound and input sub-systems as a reference task for later work. Recommendations: • Find a basic tutorial on your framework, read it and then recreate it. • You will need to first install your framework (including making sure that your IDE of choice knows where the lib and header files are, and that your running application has a copy of the required dll’s so that it can load them at run time) Spike 7: Input Handling CORE SPIKE Context: Developers need to know how to use a library that supports input for game use, and configure the library code to provide both event-based keyboard input and key-state models in order to support different input interaction models needed for typical gameplay. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to handle event-based keyboard input (key-type up/down and simpler key events) as well as a buffered state view of the entire keyboard key set. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Create a simple console application that uses your framework to capture keyboard events and display informative messages as text. Your application must demonstrate two modes of operation concurrently: 1. When a specific alpha key (a-z) is pressed “down” or is released “up”, 2. A keyboard state model that keeps track of all the current key states for number keys (1,2,.. 9,0). Recommendations: • Do NOT use images or fonts for this spike – use simple console text output only! • Read some tutorials on keyboard handling in your framework. Make sure you have examples for the type of things you need for this spike. • Given the need for “polling” and presenting the keyboard state model, a simple slow gamestyle loop could be used that polls at a set time interval and displays the current key states. For example, something simple like [—X-X—-] to indicate number keys “4” and “6” are currently being held down is fine. Spike 8: 2D Drawing CORE SPIKE Context: The facility to load 2D images from file and display them to screen is a critical part of many software applications, especially 2D and 3D games. Using a library to support this functionality requires the developer to understand a libraries API and 2D graphics terminology. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to load and display multiple images, including sub-regions of one image onto another. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Create a graphical 2D application capable of display images. Your application must: 1. Display a single image as the background image for your application, which can be toggled “on” or “off” using the “0” (zero) key 2. Load one other image that contains three identifiable sub regions within it. 3. Define three rectangles that specify the sub-region (“part”) for each cells image. a. Display each cell (“tile”) image to a unique random locations using a toggle “on” or “off” in response to the 1,2 and 3 number keys. Recommendations: • Find and read documentation and tutorials related to simple (not complex or extended) image loading and display in your framework. Note – keep this as simple as possible. • Create two of your own simple images (but do not waste time on this) saved as simple format. (.bmp is enough – there’s no need to launch into more complex formats) • Make sure you are aware of the bit-depth of your images and the screen. Always “optimize” your images to the current screen bit-depth to avoid performance penalties. • Strongly suggest that you display messages to the console that describe what is happening and help debug your program — such as “loading image1.bmp”, “tile 3 display ON at location (10, 40)” and so on. • Do not over-engineer this; if you are implementing classes or using a number of libraries you have almost certainly gone too far! Just because you can does not mean you should… Spike 9: Sound CORE SPIKE Context: Playing sounds on demand for a game, based on game events, and playing background music, are key components to creating entertaining and immersive game environments. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to use your framework to load, play and control game sound and music. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Create a simple application that demonstrates the following features. 1. Keys 1, 2, and 3 will each play a unique sample sound as soon as each key is pressed even if that sound is already playing. 2. Play or pause (not stop) background music in response to key-down press “0” (zero) being used as a toggle. Recommendations: • Find and read tutorials for playing a sound when an event occurs, and for playing and pausing the playback of music. (Note – you need to PAUSE the music, not just stop and start it again.) • Create or download some sounds and a music file suitable for your intended work. (Ensure you have the right licenses for any sound or music) • Your keyboard input spike will give you suitable code starting point for response to key events. Keep it simple. • You may need to add debug code to your work to ensure systems are initialising and loading as needed. • You will need to research an appropriate format for your sound file. Stream 3: Game Programming Patterns Description: This stream of spikes is designed to familiarise you with common Game Programming Patterns. Spikes: *Spike 10: Messaging *Spike 11: Announcements & Blackboards *Spike 12: Game State Management *Spike 13: Composite Pattern *Spike 14: Component Pattern *Spike 15: Command Pattern Spike 10: Messaging CORE SPIKE Context: Objects in games often need to communicate with a wide range of other objects. In order avoid the maintenance nightmare that is coupling every game object to every game object it could feasibly need to communicate with, a messaging system is used to help game objects communicate. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to implement a messaging system to allow the components in the Zorkish game to communicate with each other in an expandable fashion. Goals/Deliverables: [SPECIFICATION] + [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] You need to develop a messaging system to facilitate communication between game objects in your Zorkish series of Spikes. You will be using this messaging system in all future Zorkish spikes, so you’ll want to put some thought into this before you start coding – develop a specification for your messaging system that described how it will operate. You will need to consider:  How messages are sent  How messages are received and acted upon.  How messages are addressed  What content is included in a message  How objects register to receive messages  Whether a message contains information about who sent it Recommendations  You’ll need to give some thought to what form your messages will take. Some options are: o Create a Message class that contains all the message information o Create a Messaging class tree with different Message subclasses containing different information  The subclasses in such a tree can be created based on any of: message types, message components, recipient types, sender types, or combinations of these – if you go down this path you’ll need to put thought into how each Message subtype will be used. o Have a message be a pointer to a chunk of data  dangerous for a great many reasons, but has some advantages – if you choose this method, you should demonstrate awareness of the advantages and disadvantages in your specification and spike report o A string  Sometime simple is best – a string can often contain all the necessary information for a simple message, and is guaranteed to be human readable when things break o Other message data formats  There are a lot of other message data formats, each with their own advantages and disadvantages, such as XML, JSON, CSV, binary data, etc. Spike 11: Announcements & Blackboards CORE SPIKE Context: A messaging system allows for immediate communication with other objects in a robust and expandable fashion, but a one-to-one message system doesn’t suit all game scenarios. Some messages need to be sent to a number of subscribed destinations simultaneously (announcements). Other messages can only be handled by their intended recipient at some point in the future, and need to be held until they’re accessed (blackboard). Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to be able to send messages that can be addressed to a number of subscribed destinations and messages that won’t be received immediately Goals/Deliverables: [SPECIFICATION] + [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] You need to expand your messaging system from Spike 16 to include  Announcements, a single message sent to a number of subscribers  Blackboards, messages that are accessed by the recipient instead of delivered Recommendations  You’ll need to give some thought to how your addressing scheme will handle multiple recipients, and to what will differentiate an announcement-style message from a normal one: o will they be different objects? o will they use a different system? o will they be transparently handled by your messaging system without the sender and receiver knowing the difference?  You’ll also need to consider how your Blackboard will handle messages: o will it make repeated attempts to send a message? o will objects repeatedly check the blackboard for messages? o what will your Blackboard do when a destination is unavailable or invalid? o what will your Blackboard do after a message has been received? will it keep or discard it? how long will it be kept?  It’s OK for the answer to the above questions to be “not implemented” or “the system breaks” – you just have to demonstrate you’ve given some thought to these and similar problems Spike 12: Game State Management CORE SPIKE Context: Game state management is a common feature of games. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is not aware of implementation methods for flexible game state (“stages” of a game) management. Goals/Deliverables: [PAPER DESIGN] + [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] You need to create the “Zorkish Adventure” game, as described in the specification document available on the unit website. You will need to deliver the following items: 1. A simple paper-based plan for your code design. (REQUIRED) 2. Create a simple console program that implements the “Zorkish: Phase I” game (although it has no gameplay yet) using a flexible (extensible) game state management method of some kind. The OO State Pattern is the strong suggestion. The implementation must demonstrate the following game stages (states): a. “Main Menu” (which allows the user to select other stages…) b. “About” (remember to include your own details here) c. “Help” (summary of commands – simple hard-coded text is fine) d. “Select Adventure” (use a hard-coded list and the title of your test game) e. “Gameplay” (test game which only accepts “quit” and “hiscore” commands) f. “New High Score” (allows user to enter their name, but doesn’t work yet) g. “View Hall Of Fame” (view list of name/score. Simple hard-coded text is fine.) Recommendations:  Read the complete Zorkish game specification document.  If not familiar (or you need a reminder) research/read about the state pattern used to represent each “stage” of the game.  On paper create a design for your implementation. A strong suggestion is a UML class diagram representing a state pattern you would need specific to the Zorkish game.  Use an “agile” (test often) approach as you implement your design. For example, implement a single state and test, then two states and test changing between the two.  Leave complex issues or issues that might distract from this spike until last.  Stay focused on the main points of this spike – state management! Do NOT implement a complex gameplay parser, the “Hall of Fame” file IO, scoring features etc. Read later spikes to see why! Focus on the minimum to get this spike done! Spike 13: Composite Pattern CORE SPIKE Context: A text-based adventure game can create an immersive experience where entities of the game can be compositions of other entities. To do this, player commands need to act on “entities” of the game, some of which are composed of other entities. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to create and modify, for a text based adventure game, game entities that are composed of other game entities. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Building on the work of earlier Zorkish Spikes, extend the game world to support game entities composed of other game entities. Update the command parser and command manager for the game to support actions that modify the composition and location of game entities. Create part of the Zorkish game that demonstrates the following: 1. Adventure (world) files that include the specification of game entities, their properties, and any nested entities (composition) they may contain. 2. Players are able to observe and modify entities (what they contain, and their location) ie. “look in”, “take _ [from] _”, “put _ in _”, “open _ [with] _” Recommendations:  A dictionary collection making reference to objects using strings as keys, and an OO command pattern. The game location graph can be extended to support entities that are collections of entities – this is the essence of the OO composite pattern!  Read the game specifications again.  Research dictionaries – collections that can access contents using string keys. (STL)  Put designs and plans on paper. Think as much as possible before you code! (If you do this, be sure to include your paper design with your outcome report.)  Create a new adventure file that contains a minimal game world description and some entities that also contain other entities that you can use later for testing.  Update the adventure loading code so that your game world (graph) supports the entities and the composite pattern  Extend the player commands (the command pattern/manager) to enable modification of game entities composition and test  Implement other commands – and test… extend… until done.  Test. Check for memory leaks… (Seriously!) Spike 14: Component Pattern CORE SPIKE Context: Game programming often makes heavy use of inheritance, which can be appropriate for their roles as simulations (however stylised) of the real world. In many instances though, this can lead to unnecessarily deep class ‘trees’ and many abstract objects intended to represent specific properties an object deeper in the tree may have. The component pattern de – emphasises inheritance as the source of object attributes by creating objects out of components, each one contributing some attribute or function to the complete object. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to create and modify, for a text – based adventure game, game entities that are the sum of their parts, receiving attributes from components rather than inheritance. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Building on the work of earlier Zorkish Spikes, extend the game world to support game entities composed of components that contribute properties and actions. Create part of a game that demonstrates the following: 1. Game objects that receive attributes (damage, health, flammability, etc.) from component objects rather than inheritance. 2. Game objects that receive actions (can be picked up, can be attacked, etc.) from component objects rather than inheritance Recommendations:  This is a good place to start learning about the component pattern: http://cowboyprogramming.com/2007/01/05/evolve-your-heirachy/  The visitor pattern is has some similarities to the component pattern, and tutorials on implementing the visitor pattern can provide inspiration for implementations of the component pattern. Spike 15: Command Pattern CORE Context: A text-based adventure game can create an immersive experience where a player feels like the game “understands” them. One part of this is a robust way to process user input (text commands) and turn them into game world actions. The skills used to create good parsers and management of commands are also very useful in many other games and software projects. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer needs to know how to create, for a text-based adventure game, a text command parser that is robust and accepts typical human variations, and an effective way to design, manage and extend commands. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] Building on the work of earlier Zorkish Spikes and create a robust text command parser and command manager for the game. (Refer to the game specification document on the subject website for details). The command processor should accept alias commands and optional or variable number of words in commands. Create part of the Zorkish: Phase 2 game that demonstrates the following: 1. The loading of adventure files (text) that includes (partial) specification of game entities 2. A robust command processor (supporting aliases and optional words) Recommendations:  Use an OO command pattern.  Read the game specifications again.  Research the “command pattern”. (You’ll probably want Command objects and a CommandManager that can “run()” each command object when needed.)  Research “dictionaries” – collections that can access contents using string keys. (STL)  Put designs and plans on paper. Think as much as possible before you code! (If you do this, be sure to include your paper design with your outcome report.)  Create a new adventure file that contains a minimal game world description and some game entities.  Update the adventure loading code so that your game world (graph) supports entities.  Implement a simple command (but using the command pattern/manager) and test.  Implement other commands – and test… extend… until done. Stream 4: Game Data Structures Description: This stream of spikes is designed to familiarise you with data structures that are useful for storing and manipulating game data. Spikes: *Spike 16: Basic Game Data Structures *Spike 17: Graphs *Spike 18: Hash Maps Spike 16: Basic Game Data Structures CORE SPIKE Context: Game developers will often encounter a variety of different types of data and access/usage scenarios, even in a single project. It is essential, therefore, that developers be aware of the different data types available to them, their advantages and disadvantages, and suitability for different purposes. Knowledge/Skill Gap: The developer is not familiar with common data types, their various strengths and weaknesses, and their applicability in common game scenarios. Goals/Deliverables: [CODE] + [SPIKE REPORT] + [SHORT REPORT] 1. Research and evaluate three or more different data structures that could be used to create the player inventory for the Zorkish game. At a minimum you must show your awareness of advantages and disadvantages for this application. Document your evaluation criteria and results in a short report. 2. Using your decision (as documented in your short report), create a working inventory system demonstration program. Your work must demonstrate (bug free) inventory access, addition and removal. Note: The short report is

November 6, 2015

7/24/2013

November 6, 2015

ITC571 – Emerging Technologies and Innovation Capstone Project Report and Seminar

Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 1 of 35 ITC571 – Emerging Technologies and Innovation Session 2 2015 Faculty of Business School of Computing and Mathematics Internal Mode Subject Overview This subject requires research and project work, at an advanced level, on a topic related to emerging technologies and innovation. In the context of professional practice, students will draw upon prior learning in their Masters course to execute an independent capstone project in a selected topic in Information Technology. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this subject, you should be able to interpret and evaluate an overview of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation; be able to perform literature searches and critically analyse the literature in the chosen topic; be able to critically reflect on and synthesize complex information, problems, concepts and theories in the chosen topic; be able to apply project management and information and communication technologies (ICT) tools to plan, execute, record and present their research and project work as a capstone experience; be able to demonstrate advanced communication skills in transmitting their capstone experiences and ideas. Lecturer Details Subject Coordinator Rajasekaran Lakshmiganthan Email rlakshmiganthan@studygroup.com Phone To be advised. Campus To be advised. Building/Room number To be advised. About your lecturer Ather Saeed Ather Saeed is the Course Coordinator for CSU (Networking Programs) at Study Centre Melbourne. Currently pursuing his PhD (thesis titled “Fault-tolerance in the Healthcare Wireless Sensor Networks”). He has a Masters in Information Technology & Graduate Diploma ( IT) from the University of Queensland, Master of Computer Science (Canadian Institute of Graduate Studies). He has been involved in the tertiary education since 1999 (prior to joining CSU, he was the Course Coordinator at Federation University for IT Program) and has published several research papers in Journals, International conferences (held in USA, UK and Germany). His hobbies include reading, playing basket-ball and Chess. Malka Halgamuge Dr Malka N. Halgamuge is a Research Fellow / Scientist in the Department of Electrical and Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 2 of 35 Electronic Engineering of University of Melbourne. She obtained her PhD from the same department. She is an Adjunct Lecturer at Charles Sturt University, Australia. She also works as Electro Magnetic Radiation (EMR) Consultant since January 2014 (radiation hazards (RADHAZ) safety measurement and assessment). She has published more than 55 articles attracting over 400 Citations. She is listed among the Most Cited Scientists by ISI’s Essential Science Indicators (Since May 2014). She currently co-supervises a group of 4 PhD students and she has co-supervised 1 PhD student to completion (2013) at the University of Melbourne. She has awarded the (i) Australia-China Young Scientist Fellowship supported by the Commonwealth of Australia (2014), (ii) Dyason Fellowship to undertake research at Department of Epidemiology, University of California (UCLA), Los Angeles, USA (2013), (iii) Early Career Researcher (ECR) Award from 60th Anniversary of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (2014). Two of the papers she has co-authored with her PhD students received the “Best Paper Award” (2012) and “Best Student Paper Award” (2011). She was awarded the Vice-Chancellor’s Engagement Award (2010) and Vice-Chancellor’s Knowledge Transfer Award (2008) for her research at the University of Melbourne. She was awarded the Solander Fellowship for research collaboration with the Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Physics, Lund University, in 2007 and 2008. She was among the short listed applicants for both 2009 and 2010 “LOreal Australia for Women in Science Fellowship”, out of over 200 female scientists applied in Australia. Learning, Teaching and Support Strategies Class times and location Lecture 1: Wednesdays 5.00pm-8.00pm, Room 4.11 & 4.12 Lecture 2: Tuesdays 9.00am-12.00pm, Room 2.11 & 2.12 Lecture 3: Tuesdays 1.00pm-4.00pm, Room 2.11 & 2.12 Compusory workshop or Residential School There is no residential school for this subject. How to contact your lecturer Any questions concerning the teaching of this subject can be made by contacting your Subject Lecturer. Lecturer Name : Ather Saeed Lecturer Email : ASaeed @studygroup.com (mailto:MBaron@studygroup.com) Lecturer Name : Malka Halgamuge Lecturer Email : MHalgamuge@studygroup.com (mailto:MHalgamuge@studygroup.com) Email is the best option. Please send a brief message regarding the issue and include the subject name and code in your email –it really helps to know which class you belong to, before I respond to your query. If you prefer to phone me that is fine, but please leave a message if I am not there at the time – I will give you a call back as soon as I can. How you are expected to engage with the subject All of your subject materials are available on the Interact site under the Topics link in the left hand side menu. I suggest that for each topic you read the learning objectives carefully, read the overview, have a quick skim of the text and then watch the interactive tutorial. Once you have got a feel for what the topic is about try and make a good set of notes under each of the topic review questions in that topic. However, this subject is a research based subject. In this subject there are also lots of opportunities for you to engage with me, with your peers and with Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 3 of 35 the subject. I will be holding 12 regular sessions where we can discuss content issues and assessment items. As part of your assessment in this subject you are required to work alone or group for all the assessment items. It is helpful to have a small task to complete early in the session, so that you have a focus in the subject from the very first day, and so I have set a small assessment item in week 3, as part of your assessment. If you don’t complete the assessment, I may contact you by phone or email to have a chat about study and if there are any issue that I can help with. The study guide and/or subject materials for this subject have been written specifically to guide you through the sections (and questions) of the prescribed textbook relevant to each topic. You should check the Interact Site at least weekly for postings, announcements, lecture information and other resources that will assist your studies or additional information and resources vital to your success in the subject. Studying at university does not mean studying alone. Take advantage of collective wisdom and post your questions to the subject forum. Use the subject schedule to plan your studies over the session. The first assessment task in this subject is designed to identify students who are not engaged in the subject and are therefore at risk of failure or withdrawal Information on effective time management is available on the CSU Learning Support website via the following link: student.csu.edu.au Visit the Learning Support website for advice about assignment preparation, academic reading and note taking, referencing, effective time management and preparing for exams at: student.csu.edu.au You can also contact an adviser through Student Central on the following number: 1800 275 278 (or +61 2 6933 7507 from outside Australia). Library services You can find on the Library Services web site full details of how we can help you find books, articles, Australian and international databases, full-text newspapers and journals, electronic reference collections as well as links to other libraries and their catalogues: The Library website provides access to print and online material, such as books, reports, journals, articles, dissertations, newspapers, and other reference tools. You will also find guides and assistance to help you use the Library’s resources. http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/ You can find Library Services on both the CSU website and the SGA library catalogue website including access to a wide range of electronic books, electronic journals, as well as textbooks available for loan in the Darlinghurst campus library. You can also access reports, journals, articles, dissertations, full text newspapers, and online reference resources (e.g. ABS statistics, Australian standards, encyclopaedias, dictionaries), as well as links to other libraries and their catalogues: http://aleph.unilinc.edu.au/sga – SGA Melbourne library catalogue including electronic books and electronic journals online. http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/ – CSU Library Services including Primo Search catalogue, online tutorials and video tutorials in research skills, finding articles for assignments, topic analysis, Endnote referencing program and many other online library services to help you successfully complete your assignments for all CSU courses. http://trove.nla.gov.au/ – Powerful search engine from National Library of Australia to access many Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 4 of 35 different online resources on any subject from one search. Contact Details for renewing loans, locating books and other information: SGA Melbourne Library: Marian Lees – Director, Library Services Email: MLees@studygroup.com Library Help Friendly and quick assistance available. Ask for help finding information and navigating the library’s extensive eResources. http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/help/ask Online Tutorials Learn how to: •use Primo Search to find eReserve material and journal articles. •identify appropriate sources of information and peer reviewed material, and evaluate resources. •search journal databases and web resources for information for your assessments. http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/how-to/watch-it Bookmark your Subject Library Guide Subject Library guides are a great way to get started with research. Each online guide is tailored to a specific area of study, outing how to research in your area and where to look for information. http://libguides.csu.edu.au/ Academic learning support assistance Visit the learning support website for advice about assignment preparation, academic reading and note-taking, referencing, and preparing for exams at: http://student.csu.edu.au/study You may also contact: Ann Ahn Email: aahn@studygroup.com Phone: (03) TBA For appointments, please see Reception. Queries regarding the content of this subject should be directed to your subject lecturer. Your workload in this subject Each week you should spend around 9 – 11 hours studying this subject – obviously some weeks may require more time than other depending on how you work – but the following is a guide for your information. Supporting readings 3.0 hours Participation in weekly class 3.0 hours Participation in discussion forum 2.0 hours Preparation of assessment items 3 hours Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 5 of 35 Text and Learning Materials Prescribed text(s) There is NO prescribed text for this subject. What you read and how much you read will depend on your chosen topic. Schedule Session Week Week Commencing Topics Learning activities 1 27 July 2015 Topic 1 How to find trends with emerging technologies & innovation Selecting a topic and setup Interact Project site and/or use blog for documentation of weekly progress 2 3 August 2015 Topic 1 continued Capstone Research Topic is finalised and posted to main Discussion forum 3 & 4 10 August 2015 Topic 2 Project Planning Topic 3 Research Skills Use software to develop a project plan with WBS, milestones and Gantt chart. e.g. Microsoft Project or open source tools like GanttProject (http://www.ganttproject.biz/) or OpenProj (http://sourceforge.net/projects/openproj) or OpenProject (https://www.openproject.org/about) or ProjectLibre (http://www.projectlibre.org/) Assessment Item 1 Due : 14 August 2015 5 17 August 2015 Topic 4 Extracting information from readings for critical analysis Continue to work with Modules and your capstone project work. 6 24 August 2015 Topics 4 and 5 Continue Continue to work with Modules and your capstone project work. Break 31 August 2015 Continue to work with Modules and your capstone project work. 7 7 September 2015 Topic 5 Preparing and writing a literature review or capstone report Assessment Item 2 Literature Review : 11 September 2015 8 14 September 2015 Topic 5 continued Assessment Item 3 Weekly Progress Report : 18 September 2015 9 21 September 2015 Topic 6 Presenting a seminar Prepare/Edit Final Project Report that documents ALL of the Capstone Project. 10 28 September 2015 Capstone Project Report and Seminar Finalise Capstone Project Report and Seminar 11 5 October Assessment Item 4 Capstone Project Report and Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 6 of 35 Session Week Week Commencing Topics Learning activities 2015 Seminar : 9 October 2015 12 12 October 2015 Examination period 19 October – 30 October 2015 Assessment Information Introduction to assessment To protect the academic integrity of the subject, you may be asked to complete an additional test (which may be verbal) if I or another member of the teaching staff have doubts that the work that you have submitted for an assessment item is your own. This test would be held within 4 weeks of the submission of the assessment. Detailed information regarding: Sample exam (for subjects with a formal exam) Pass requirements Grades Presentation Submissions Extensions Penalties for late submission Assignment return Resubmission Plagiarism are included in Appendix 1. Assessment Items Item number Title Type Value Due date* Return date** 1 Capstone Project Proposal and Plan Assignment 15% 14-Aug-2015 04-Sep-2015 2 Literature Review Assignment 25% 11-Sep-2015 02-Oct-2015 3 Weekly Progress Reports Assignment 10% Variable Variable 4 Capstone Project Report and Seminar Assignment 50% 09-Oct-2015 30-Oct-2015 * due date is the last date for assessment items to be received at the University ** applies only to assessment items submitted by the due date Assessment item 1 Capstone Project Proposal and Plan Value: 15% Due date: 14-Aug-2015 Return date: 04-Sep-2015 Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 7 of 35 1. 2. a. b. c. d. e. 3. a. b. c. 4. a. b. c. d. 5. 6. a. b. c. 7. Length: 1000-2000 words (5-6 pages) Submission method options Alternative submission method Task WHAT TO DO: Follow the Study Schedule and work with the Topics (Modules) in Interact as they provide a “scaffold” for your learning in this subject. Develop a detailed Capstone Project Proposal and Plan using project management software (as listed in the Study Schedule) and the skills you have acquired from IT Project Management to develop a project plan with a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), milestones and Gantt chart. These tools may help. MicrosoftProject Pro ( http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/project/); Open source tools like GanttProject ( http://www.ganttproject.biz/); OpenProj( http://sourceforge.net/projects/openproj/) OpenProject ( https://www.openproject.org/about). ProjectLibre ( http://www.projectlibre.org/) Begin a ‘ project blog’ for your chosen emerging technology topic. The blog is a way to not only “think by writing” and make your notes but also store project files and links in a cloud-based service. Consider sharing the site with your peers as a way to harness each others knowledge. For Distance mode students, the Blog can be used for your Weekly Progress Reports (as an alternative to the Discussion Board) in Assessment Item 3. CSU Thinkspace at http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/ (use your CSU Login ID) is recommended or WordPress, Google’s Blogger ( https://www.blogger.com/home) are common blogging systems, but you may have your own favourite site to use. Choose and develop a limited blogger profile and enter a suitable TITLE for your blog (e.g. Joe’s Wireless Technology Project) – not your full name For WEB ADDRESS – use your student number as your account name (URL) or other unique identifier. Make a first post – a short introduction about you and the project – remember to save, then Publish the blog entry. Check with a friend or family member to ensure that he/she can see your first posting. This is also to check you have the right URL to include in this proposal and plan for your project. The blog is ideally updated each week with 3 or 4 entries, at a minimum standard and will become a valuable tool for the Weekly Progress Reports AND/OR for documenting your project notes and as the foundation for editing and writing the Capstone Project Report. An ideal blog entry will have around 50-150 words (150-600 words a week). Describe how you intend to submit/present your Weekly Progress Reports to peers from Week 2: In Class (only option for on-campus students) Interact2 Discussion Board My Project Blog (provide Website address) Group Work OPTION for Assessment Items (Not recommended for Distance mode students): The Group Capstone Project Proposal and Plan is submitted by the team of three (3 maximum group size) for a group mark on a project proposal and plan that clearly indicates the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), Role and Responsibilities of EACH member to carry an equal share of the load in the project work. Rationale Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 8 of 35 The Capstone Topic Project Plan allows for a broad range of project areas like systems administration, database systems, IT security, mobile technology etc. Often the project has a sponsor and is linked to your interest or workplace needs. The proposal has a r esearch component (Assessment Item 2 Literature Review) so in some cases you may need to find a supervisor willing to accept you as a candidate. The Learning Outcomes being assessed in this item include how you interpret and evaluate an overview of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation and begin to to plan, execute, record and present your research and project work as a capstone experience. Your Capstone Project Proposal and Plan will be evaluated with a series of questions that you can use as a Checklist: Is the capstone topic area appropriate? Has the Project Blog been setup? Has there been sufficient justification of the choice of the topic? Is there enough scope for a sufficiently deep/complex analysis? Is the scope appropriate for what might be reasonably expected in the capstone project subject? Is the methodology proposed clear? Are the deliverables clearly set out? Are the deliverables sufficiently complex to justify a pass in this activity? Is it likely that the proposed activities can be reasonably carried out? Is it likely that the student will have access to the necessary resources to do a satisfactory job? Is the time line proposed realistic? Marking criteria Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 9 of 35 The ITC571 Capstone Project Proposal and Plan Assessment Criteria Criteria HD => 85% DI 75-84% CR 65-74% PS 50-64% Project Blog is created and functional and of the topic area is appropriate and has been justified by student and supervisor/sponsor. 10.00% The rationale and recommendations by the supervisor or sponsor of the project demonstrate that an evaluation of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation has led to an appropriate topic selection. The Project Blog contains justification of the topic and information and facts about the problem and purpose of the investigation. 8.50 to 10.00% The rationale and recommendations by the supervisor or sponsor of the project demonstrate that an evaluation of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation has led to an appropriate topic selection. The Project Blog contains justification of the topic and some information and a few facts about the problem and purpose of the investigation. 7.50 to 8.49% The rationale and recommendations by the supervisor or sponsor of the project do not necessarily demonstrate that an evaluation of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation has led to an appropriate topic selection. The Project Blog contains justification of the topic is done briefly with a few with information and facts but very little or no purpose of the investigation. 6.50 to 7.49% The rationale is not clear and the project has no clear recommendations by any sponsor or supervisor. Incomplete Project Blog or none exists. Topic selection has not been fully justified by inclusion of information and facts about the problem and purpose of the investigation. 5.00 to 6.49% Project scope, methodology, presentation and project management tools and techniques used 30.00% Proposal is well written with no grammatical or spelling errors has evidence that is has been reviewed at least once. Project Scope, Methodology and all project management tools and techniques are included, such as timeline, WBS, Gantt chart, All sections in the proposal and plan are clearly set our for the reader. 25.50 to 30.00% Proposal is well written with only a few grammatical or spelling errors and has evidence that is has been reviewed at least once. Project Scope, Methodology and all project management tools and techniques are mostly included, such as timeline, WBS, Gantt chart, The proposal and plan overall are clearly set our for the reader. 22.50 to 25.49% Proposal is well written with several grammatical or spelling errors but has no evidence that is has been reviewed. Project Scope, Methodology and all project management tools and techniques are mostly included, such as timeline, WBS, Gantt chart, Most sections in the proposal and plan are clearly set our for the reader. 19.50 to 22.49% Proposal is not well written with many grammatical or spelling errors and no evidence that is has been reviewed. Project Scope, Methodology and a project management tool was used, but not all techniques are complete such the timeline, WBS or Gantt chart, Further refinement of the proposal and plan are expected. 15.00 to 19.49% Practicality of the resources, a realistic timeline and the deliverables in the proposed solution. 20.00% Proposed solution demonstrates full understanding of real-world constraints and the timeline in WBS and Gantt chart specifies due dates for required deliverables. Materials list is reasonable, given resources. Proposal clearly links the problem to the proposed solution. 17.00 to 20.00% Proposed solution demonstrates a good understanding of real-world constraints and the timeline in WBS and Gantt chart specifies most due dates for required deliverables. Materials list is mostly reasonable, given resources. Proposal does link to the problem to the proposed solution. 15.00 to 16.99% Proposed solution demonstrates a poor understanding of real-world constraints and the timeline in WBS and Gantt chart is breif and only specifies some of the due dates for required deliverables. Materials list is lacking details, given resources. Proposal makes very little connection between the proposed solution and the problem. 13.00 to 14.99% Proposed solution is too general or incomplete in places and demonstrates a lack of understanding of real-world constraints. The WBS and Gantt chart are too generic or missing and only specifies some of the due dates for required deliverables. Materials list is not given. Proposal makes no connection between the proposed solution and the problem. 10.00 to 12.99% Critical Thinking and Identifies strengths and weaknesses Identifies strengths and weaknesses Identifies some personal Identifies some personal Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 10 of 35 understanding of the problem and consideration of users 30.00% in own thinking: recognizes personal assumptions, values and perspectives, compares to others’, and evaluates them in the context of alternate points of view. 25.50 to 30.00% in own thinking: recognizes personal assumptions, values and perspectives, compares to others’, with some comparisons of alternate points of view. 22.50 to 25.49% assumptions, values, and perspectives; recognizes some assumptions, values and perspectives of others; shallow comparisons of alternate points of view. 19.50 to 22.49% assumptions, values, and perspectives; does not consider alternate points of view. 15.00 to 19.49% Timeliness and completion of project proposal and plan. 10.00% All required elements of the project proposal and plan are completed and produced on time. 8.50 to 10.00% Most of required elements of the project proposal and plan are produced on time. 7.50 to 8.49% Only a few required elements of the project proposal and plan are completed and produced on time. 6.50 to 7.49% Not all required elements of the project proposal and plan are completed or produced on time. 5.00 to 6.49% Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 11 of 35 1. a. b. 2. a. b. 3. 4. 5. 6. a. b. c. d. e. 7. a. b. c. d. e. 8. 9. 1. 2. 3. 4. a. b. Presentation Capstone Project Plan Sample Format (subject to change or modified to include systems development projects) Title: Emerging Technology and Innovation Topic Project Blog ( Web address provided) Weekly Progress Reports Plan (In class, Discussion Board or Project Blog entries) Rationale Problem domain Purpose and justification Sponsor or Supervisor recommendation Research Questions (if applicable) Conceptual or Theoretical Framework Methodology Research and Systems Development method(s) Data collection or systems design methods Ethical Issues Compliance Requirements (Workplace, Industry or Government regulations) Analysis of data Project Plan Deliverables (Conclusions, Recommendations, Software code etc.) Work breakdown structure (WBS) Risk Analysis Duration Gantt chart References Appendix (if required) Assessment item 2 Literature Review Value: 25% Due date: 11-Sep-2015 Return date: 02-Oct-2015 Length: 2000 words (10-12 pages) Submission method options Alternative submission method Task WHAT TO DO: Tasks 1 and 2 below TASK 1 Literature Review 20% Write a Literature Review for your Capstone Topic following a set structure. The Literature Review is a critical examination of the most relevant, recent and scholarly research on the topic area that is not just a summary of the articles you have read on done in Topics 1 to 5. For Group Work OPTION teams only: Assessment Item 3 Literature Review is done INDIVIDUALLY by ALL students and will be combined and included in the final Group Capstone Project Report. Ensure that the Literature Review submitted by you is your own work and has not been submitted elsewhere and comply with the University’s requirements for academic integrity. You can get help in Writing a Literature Review from the ITC571 Modules tool and other study advices and tips from: Study Resources (PDF files to download): http://student.csu.edu.au/study/resources Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 12 of 35 4. b. c. d. 5. 6. 7. APA style Referencing from http://student.csu.edu.au/study/referencing-at-csu. The CSU Library website for LibGuides in Information Technology, Computing and Mathematics at http://libguides.csu.edu.au/cat.php?cid=66969 EndNote Bibliographic software and tutorials LibGuide at http://libguides.csu.edu.au/endnote Review the emerging technology (use internet, magazines, news articles, online databases, eBooks) and submit a 2000-word review of the literature on your topic. Templates are available in the Resources section or from your lecturer to help guide you through the process of extracting information from a collection of articles. A good place to start a collection of articles in your review of the literature is via the PRIMO search tool located on the CSU Library website at http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library As an example, the Capstone Topic PRIMO search on a topic like “near field communication applications” returned the following list of very recent journals, books, conference proceedings and eBooks related to the Topic: Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 13 of 35 1. 2. 3. 4. Library Resources Information Technology Journal Databases: http://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/find-info/databases/subject/infotech Information Technology & Computing LibGuides : http://libguides.csu.edu.au/itc The following questions may be useful while reviewing the topic: What is the new technology? What does it do and what are the special features it has? When is it coming out in the market and how much will it cost? What industry will the new technology affect? (Medical, agricultural, computer, business, Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 14 of 35 4. 5. 6. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. etc….). In your opinion, will the new technology be beneficial to society? Why or why not. What did you learn from a critical analysis of your sources of information on this new technology? TASK 2 Originality Report and Questions 5% Generate a Turnitin originality report and submit this report via TURNITIN; Answer the following questions to interpret the Turnitin originality report. The questions can be found through the following link: http://www.academicinternational.org/teaching/turnitin.pdf Submit your question answers via TURNITIN. Turnitin is more than a ‘gotcha’ device – it is an effective learning tool: Because the sophisticated use of sources involves a complex set of research, critical thinking, and writing skills, you should expect to take several years to master them. Turnitin can be a helpful tool in this developmental process. You should use your originality reports as feedback on a first draft so that you can improve your use of sources before submitting the final draft for marking. Interpreting the Turnitin Originality Report: After you submit your draft to Turnitin for self-checking, you should look carefully at the originality report so that you can improve on your use of sources. Your essay will be on the left side of the screen, and the matching colour-coded sources will be listed on the right. Then you can make the necessary changes to your essay before you submit the final draft for marking. You need to register with Turnitin to create a Student Account under the CSU Turnitin Licence at http://www.turnitin.com/login_page.asp Further information on how to use Turnitin can be found through the following link: http://student.csu.edu.au/study/plagiarism/checking Rationale The rationale of this assessment is to test your ability to review, evaluate, critique and support others opinions as well as existing literature, using a scholarly writing style. You will also demonstrate your ability to carry out independently research and locate information from various sources such as journals, conference proceedings, online databases, eBooks and industry magazines. The Learning Outcomes being assessed in this second task include your ability to perform literature searches and critically analyse the literature in the chosen topic and then to critically reflect on and synthesize complex information, problems, concepts and theories in the chosen topic. As the Literature Review develops, so will also be demonstrating your advanced communication and academic writing skills in transmitting your capstone experiences and ideas to others. What does a well written literature review contain? That is a research topic on its own, however I recommend the list of SIX structural elements below are found in most well written literature reviews: Interpretation and evaluation of an overview of recent trends in emerging technologies and innovation; Evidence of literature searches and critical analysis of the literature in the chosen capstone Charles Sturt University Subject Outline ITC571 201560 SM I-2 July 2015-Version 1 Page 15 of 35 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. topic; Critical reflection and synthesis of complex information, problems, concepts and theories in the chosen topic; Original opinion on the benefits of your capstone project to others; Reflective comments on what was learnt from a review of the literature; Use of correct citations and referencing conforming to recognised referencing format. The Checklist for the li

November 6, 2015

honest tea

Business Plan for 1999 December 1998 4905 Del Ray Avenue, Suite 304 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Phone: 301-652-3556 Fax: 301-652-3557 Email: sethandbarry@honesttea.com Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Mission Statement ..…………………………………………………………4 Executive Summary ..………………………………………………………..5 Company Story ..…………………………………………………………….6 Product.……………………………………………………………………….6 Product description ..…………………………………………..…….6-8 Flagship line of flavors and new flavors for 1999……………………..8-9 Production and manufacturing ..………………………………..……9-10 Market Opportunity …………………………………………………………10 Profile of target customer ……………………………………………12 Market research and market response ……………………………….13-16 Marketing and Distribution …………………………………………………..16 Distribution and promotion …………………………………………..16-17 Packaging and pricing …..……………………………………………17 International markets …………………..……………………….…….17-18 Product development and future products ……………………………18 Management …………………………………………………………………..18-20 Statement and aspirations for social responsibility ……………………………20-21 Financial Statements YTD and Projections ……………………………………21-23 The Investment Opportunity …………………………………………………..24 The Offering ……………………………………………………………24 Financing History ….…………………………………………………..24 Exit strategies ………………………………………………………….25 Investment risks ………………….…………………………………….25 Competitive Advantage ………………………….…………………….25-26 A Parting Thought .………………………………………………….……..…26 Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 3 Mission Statement Honest Tea seeks to provide bottled tea that tastes like teaa world of flavor freshly brewed and barely sweetened. We seek to provide better-tasting, healthier teas the way nature and their cultures of origin intended them to be. We strive for relationships with our customers, employees, suppliers and stakeholders which are as healthy and honest as the tea we brew. Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 4 Executive Summary Honest Tea, a bottled iced tea company, has completed a strong summer of sales in the mid-Atlantic region and is now raising capital to fund the brand’s expansion across the United States as well as overseas. Since the all-natural tea first hit the mid-Atlantic market in June of 1998, Honest Tea has developed a loyal following of customers who have made the product the best-selling tea in its largest account, Fresh Fields/Whole Food Markets, significantly outselling Snapple and the Whole Foods 365 brand. In addition to success in retail channels, Honest Tea has also been warmly received in food service channels. Unlike the sweetened tea drinks made from concentrate or powder which currently dominate the $2 billion bottled tea market, Honest Tea is brewed with loose leaf tea and then barely sweetened with pure cane sugar or honey. The product is poised to take advantage of the rapid growth in the bottled tea, bottled water, and natural food markets, as well as the developing “tea culture” in the United States. It also has potential to tap into the large market of health-conscious diet soda drinkers. The target audience is an emerging subset of the population, which seeks out authentic products and is attuned to global and environmental issues. Toward the end of the summer and through the fall the company continued to penetrate large supermarket chains and is in the process of finalizing a national network of brokers and distributors for 1999. In September 1998 the company hired two sales managers, each of whom brings more than 15 years of experience and contacts to the business. Although there was an often painful and occasionally costly product development phase, the company has now perfected the brewing and production process to the point where it can produce several thousand cases in one shift with the desired consistency. In early 1999 the company will add a West Coast site to its current East Coast production site. In addition, the company will be implementing steps to consolidate its packaging operation which will widen the per case profit margin. The company has demonstrated an ability to gain free media coverage, including stories in the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and Fitness Magazine. It has also cultivated a loyal customer base among some of the country’s most influential celebrities which it intends to publicize at the appropriate time. It has just entered into a contract with a wellrecognized public relations firm, which has demonstrated its success with several earlystage companies. Finally, the company has finalized a partnership with a Native American tribe that will position Honest Tea to emerge as a leader in the socially responsible business movement. Honest Tea is looking to raise up to $1.2 million in equity capital to finance the national distribution of the product as well as the introduction of two new flavors and international sales. Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 5 Company Story Honest Tea is a company brewed in the classic entrepreneurial tradition. After a parching run through Central Park in 1997, Seth Goldman teamed up with his Yale School of Management professor, Barry Nalebuff, to reignite their three-year old conversation on the beverage industry. While at Yale Goldman and Nalebuff had converged on the opportunity in the beverage market between the supersweet drinks and the flavorless waters. The energy they share around the idea of a less-sweet beverage leads to several marathon tea-brewing sessions. Their conversation is fueled in part by their extensive travels through tea-drinking cultures such as India, China and Russia. As ideas and investors for the company gather critical mass, Seth takes the dive. He leaves his marketing and sales post at Calvert Group, the nation’s largest family of socially and environmentally responsible mutual funds, and launches Honest Tea out of the guest room in his house. Using five large thermoses and label mock-ups, he sells the product to the eighteen Fresh Fields stores of the Whole Foods Market chain. Once the tea has been manufactured, the company moves into a small office and distributes tea out of U-Hauls until other distributors start carrying the product. By the end of the summer, Honest Tea has become the best-selling tea throughout the Fresh Fields chain and has been accepted by several national supermarket chains and distributors. The Product The Taste: Bottled tea that tastes like tea, freshly brewed and barely sweetened Somewhere between the pumped-up, sugar-saturated drinks and the tasteless waters, there is a need for a healthier beverage which provides genuine natural taste without the artificially concocted sweeteners and preservatives designed to compensate for lack of taste. Honest Tea allows people to enjoy the world’s second most popular drink the way hundreds of civilizations and nature intended it to be. Tea that tastes like tea — A world of flavor freshly brewed and barely sweetened. The concept of Honest Tea is as direct and clear as the tea we brew – we start with select tea leaves from around the world, then we brew the tea in spring water and add a hint of honey or pure cane sugar. Finally, we filter the tea to produce a pure genuine taste that doesn’t need a disguise. Unlike most of the bottled teas in the marketplace, Honest Tea is not made with bricks of tea dust, tea concentrate, or other artificial sweeteners or acids. The tea has no bitter aftertaste or sugar kick, and does not leave a syrupy film on the drinker’s teeth. To make a comparison with wine, today’s leading iced teas are like jug wine and Honest Tea is like Robert Mondavi Opus One. But unlike fine wine, premium bottled tea is quite affordable, usually priced under $1.50 for 16 ounces. Although taste is the primary benefit of drinking Honest Tea, the product has three other benefits which enhance its acceptance and marketability: Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 6 Low in calories: A 12-ounce serving of Honest Tea has 17 calories, dramatically less than other bottled teas or comparable beverages. We have found that the low-calorie profile of Honest Tea makes the drink attractive to three key audiences – 1) Disenchanted bottled tea drinkers who think the drinks are too sweet, 2) Bottled water drinkers who long for taste and variety and 3) diet soda drinkers who are interested a low-calorie beverage that doesn’t contain artificial sweeteners such as Nutrasweet. The following table illustrates the difference between Honest Tea and the rest of the beverage market: There are three other players in the less-sweetened bottled tea market that can be considered among the competition for Honest Tea: TeJava, Malibu Teaz and The Republic of Tea. All three brands are currently based and primarily focused on the West Coast. We are heartened by their existence because it confirms our belief that there are untapped opportunities in the beverage market, particularly on the East Coast, where none of the new entrants has any significant presence. TeJava, which is enjoying a warm reception in California, is a mild-tasting, zero-calorie unsweetened tea produced by Crystal Geyser that comes in only one flavor. We believe this product, which has been described by a beverage consultant as “water with a tea aftertaste,” would be more flavorful if it were barely sweetened. While TeJava clearly competes with our product, we believe there is room for more than one product in the low-calorie tea marketplace. We also believe that Honest Tea has an edge over TeJava because our drinks are more flavorful and come in a wider variety of flavors. Calories per 8-ounce serving 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Honest Tea Nestea Tazo Tazoberry Tradew inds Honey w / Ginseng Lipton Lemon Mistic SoBe Oolong AriZona Coca-Cola Snapple Lemon Tropicana Pure Premium Fruitopia Fruit Passion Nantuckt Nectrs Pnpple Orng Guva Starbucks Frappucino Ocean Spray CranGrape Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 7 Malibu Teaz is a company focused on lightly sweetened herbal tea, 35 calories for an 8 ounce serving. The products seem to have limited distribution and the label, which features a topless mermaid, seems designed to cater to a different clientele than Honest Tea. The Republic of Tea is a well-established producer of loose leaf teas which has recently begun selling unsweetened bottled tea exclusively through its catalogue and premium restaurants. The cost of a four-pack in the catalogue is $15.00, or $3.75 for a 17 ounce bottle. We believe that this price is not viable in retail channels and have spoken with several disillusioned distributors whose experience confirms that assumption. Even if the Republic of Tea changed its sales strategy, we still see room for more than one player in the low-calorie tea market. We also think the modest amount of natural sweetener in Honest Tea helps create a superior flavor. One other brand that can be considered competition is Tazo, which presents itself as “The reincarnation of Tea.” While Tazo is enjoying some success in natural foods channels, we feel that Honest Tea is different from Tazo in three important ways: first Honest Tea is genuine tea whereas Tazo is usually tea mixed with juice or other sweeteners, (usually 80 calories for an 8-ounce serving). Secondly, Tazo’s packaging, with its mysterious symbols and discussion of “the mumbled chantings of a certified tea shaman” is designed to reach a New Age audience. In contrast, the colorful art on the Honest Tea labels are accessible to a wider audience, offering a more genuine tea experience. Finally, Tazo’s price point is significantly higher than Honest Tea in supermarket channels, selling for $1.69 versus Honest Tea’s price of $1.19. Where the two brands have competed head-tohead, Honest Tea has significantly outsold, and in many cases, eliminated Tazo from the shelf. Our response to Tazo’s “reincarnation of tea” is that tea doesn’t need to be reincarnated if it is made right the first time. Health benefits of brewed tea: The curative properties of tea have been known for thousands of years. Because Honest Tea is brewed from genuine tea leaves it imparts many health benefits not found in tea-flavored drinks. In addition to serving as a digestive aid, tea has powerful antioxidants, which impair the development of free radicals which contribute to cancer and heart disease. The antioxidants in green tea are believed to be at least 100 times more effective than Vitamin C and twenty-five times better than Vitamin E at protecting cells and DNA from damage believed to be linked to cancer, heart disease and other potentially life-threatening illnesses. Cultural experience of tea: Each Honest Tea flavor is brewed based on a recipe perfected over generations in a specific region of the world. As a result, drinking Honest Tea becomes a cultural experience, from the genuine tastes to the distinctive international art and information on the label. While some bottled teas seek to cloak themselves in a cosmopolitan mantle by including exotic-looking drawings on the label, the front of each Honest Tea label features authentic art from the culture of origin. Flagship line of flavors – Our flagship line of teas come from four different continents: Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 8 Kashmiri Chai – The people of Kashmir have mixed spices into their chai for generations. Our recipe is made with spring water, premium tea leaves, crushed cardamom, cinnamon, orange peel, cloves, pepper, ginger, malic acid and a touch of sucanat evaporated sugar cane juice. Approximately one third the caffeine of coffee. Black Forest Berry — Our Black Forest Berry tea is a fruit infusion made with spring water, hibiscus, currants, strawberries, raspberries, brambleberries, elderberries, and a touch of unrefined organic cane sugar. Caffeine-free. Moroccan Mint — Our Moroccan Mint is a tightly rolled green tea from China blended with a generous amount of peppermint, brewed in spring water with citric acid and a touch of white clover honey. Approximately one fourth the caffeine of coffee. Gold Rush — Our Gold Rush tea is an herbal infusion made with spring water, rooibush, rosehips, chamomile, cinnamon, peppermint, ginger, orange peel, malic acid, and a touch of raw cane sugar, and a natural flavors. Caffeine-free. Assam – These golden-tipped flowery leaves from the Sonarie Estate gain their distinctive taste from being picked as tender leaf buds at the height of the season. Brewed in spring water with Vitamin C, malic acid, unrefined organic cane sugar, and a hint of maple syrup. Approximately one half the caffeine of coffee. In early 1999 we will be introducing two new teas: Decaf Ceylon — In response to feedback from more than 500 sampling events where we continually heard requests for a decaffeinated black tea, we will be introducing a Decaf Ceylon with lemon grass. The label for this tea features original art which captures the cultural and relaxing attributes of the tea. First Nation’s Peppermint – After months of negotiation and a consultation with the tribal elders, we have developed an organic herbal tea in conjunction with a woman-owned company based on the Crow Reservation in Montana. This tea is exciting not only for its flavor but also for the partnership we have developed with the tribe. In addition to licensing the flavor and artwork from the tribe, we are also buying the tea from our partner on the reservation with the understanding that over time the community will develop the capacity to grow all the ingredients on the reservation. This unprecedented relationship should prove to be a valuable public relations tool. Production and Manufacturing Though we had our share of “learning experiences” along the way, we have developed several proprietary brewing tools and techniques which enable us to manufacture several thousand cases of tea a day on both coasts with the desired consistency. In addition, since we have a full-time brewmaster on staff, the company retains the knowledge of manufacturing the product, instead of relying on a co-packer for that information. Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 9 The tea is brewed at a brewing and bottling facility located within driving range of the target market. The site was selected based on numerous criteria including capacity, reputation, quality control, production efficiency and willingness to invest in a long-term partnership with Honest Tea. All partners involved in the production process meet United States Department of Agriculture Hazard Analysis Critical Control Plant (HACCP) standards. We are in the process of obtaining Kosher certification from the Orthodox Union (“Circle U”). In early 1999 we will be making a change in our manufacturing process that will not affect the quality of the product but will have important ramifications for our profitability. Instead of a two-step packaging process, we will consolidate the brewing and labeling under one roof. This consolidation will save Honest Tea more than two dollars a case. Our tea leaves are provided by internationally known companies that specialize in tea buying, blending and importation. Our primary source is Hälssen & Lyon of Germany, the largest specialty tea company in the world. Another, Assam Tea Traders, has direct ties to tea estates in the Assam District of Northern India. The other ingredients are commodities which are in plentiful supply. As the Company grows in size, we anticipate dealing more directly with the tea growers. We intend to visit the tea estates so that we can verify that the labor conditions of the tea workers meet international standards and International Labor Organization conventions. We also aspire to ensure that the tea is grown organically. Market Opportunity Beyond Snapple – The Emerging Market for Quality Bottled Tea We have identified four market trends that are fueling demand for Honest Tea within the $72 billion non-alcoholic liquid refreshment beverage market. 1. Explosive growth in Ready-to-Drink (RTD) tea and bottled water markets — Although carbonated soft drinks still dominate the beverage market, in the past ten years Explosive growth in RTD tea & water markets Boom in Natural Foods Demand for a healthier, genuine bottled tea Rise of Cultural Creatives Emergence of tea culture Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 10 Ready-To-Drink teas and bottled water have emerged as alternatives. Since 1992 the US tea market has enjoyed 60% annual growth, reaching sales of $2 billion in 1996. The bottled water market has grown to $2.4 billion, with most of the growth fueled by sales of single-serving bottles. RTD Tea (estimated) Water Soft Drinks 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 RTD Tea (estimated) Water Soft Drinks 1997 U.S. Beverage consumption in billions of gallons* *Water and Soft drink figures come from Beverage Marketing, Inc. The RTD Tea figure is based on 1997 sales estimate of $2.5 billion, which equates to roughly one billion gallons. 2. Beyond the tea bag — The emergence of tea culture – Snapple and similar brands helped make tea accessible to a broader population. But now in the same way that gourmet coffees have become popular, consumers are beginning to develop an appreciation for finer teas. Over the last six years U.S. loose leaf tea sales have more than doubled, from $1.8 billion in 1990 to $4.2 billion in 19961 . According to the Tea Council, there are over a thousand tea houses or tea parlors in the country, mostly opened within the last two or three years. These parlors focus almost exclusively on tea, products that go with tea as well as tea hardware. They carry names such as Teaism, TeaLuxe, Elixir Tonics and Teas, and Tea & Company. Even Lipton is opening a flagship tea bar in Pasadena, California. In addition to the burgeoning of tea cafes, tea culture is spreading in the form of tea magazines, tea-flavored ice cream, frozen tea ice bars, tea-scented perfume and bubble bath, tea jelly, tea calendars and even books about tea. The paperback Loving Tea was recently spotted as a “cash register book” at the bookstore, commanding prime space next to Dilbert and Chicken Soup for the Soul. 3. The natural foods boom – The natural product category has also exploded in the past 6 years. Fueled by an increase in health consciousness and rising environmental awareness, demand has grown for foods and products which are best when eaten or used as close to their original state in nature. According to Natural Foods Merchandiser, the natural products industry has nearly tripled in size since 1990 from $4.2 billion to $11.5 billion in 1996. And the boom is expected to continue well into the next decade. Analysts, such as Mark Hanratty of Paine Webber, are forecasting 15-20 percent annual growth over the next three to five years, reaching $50 billion by 2003. 1 Investor’s Business Daily, “Tea: Are you Prepared to Join the Party?”, January 30, 1998, p1. Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 11 4. Rise of Cultural Creatives – Market research in the past three years has identified a consumer mindset which would seem to be particularly receptive to Honest Tea. A 1996 study by the market research firm American LIVES identified a subset of the population, roughly 44 million Americans, which they labeled “Cultural Creatives”2 . Among the key characteristics and values identified for this group, the following seem to make them ideal customers for Honest Tea: • Experiential consumers – they want to know where a product came from, how it was made, and who made it • Holistic – they view nature as sacred; they form the core market for alternative health care and natural foods • Aggressive consumers of cultural products, love of things foreign and exotic • Desire for authenticity – favoring high integrity over high fashion • Disdainful of mainstream media and consumerist culture which, in their view, is too superficial, not enough attention to the full story • Attuned to global issues and whole systems, have a sense of belonging to a global village Profile of Target Customer – When we combine these four trends and compare them with the demographics of the Cultural Creatives study as well as other market demographic information3 , we are able to develop a profile of our target customers: • 60% women, 40% men • Median age 42, with a range from 30-65 • Likely to live near a concentrated urban area • Likely to have graduated college or have an advanced degree • Likely to currently be bottled water or RTD tea drinkers, occasionally drink iced cappuccino • Interested in running, hiking and outdoor healthy activities • Average family income $52,000 Market Research – To test the receptivity of this audience to Honest Tea, we held two focus groups in New York. The sessions, facilitated by an independent market research firm, provided encouraging results and helpful guidance in terms of product line and label presentation. The first focus group consisted of health-conscious women between the ages of 30 and 60, all of whom occasionally drink bottled tea or bottled water. The second 2 American Demographics, February 1997, Dr. Paul H. Ray 3 1997 MRI Spring data, population weighted Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 12 group was a mix of men and women who were selected based on their responses to questions which identified them as fitting the Cultural Creatives profile. The sessions began with a discussion of what was missing in the beverage market. Within 5 minutes, unprompted by the moderator, both groups agreed that they wanted something that was not as boring as water but didn’t have all the “junk” in commercial bottled tea. One important lesson from the focus groups was that most consumers have a limited understanding about the differences between tea varieties. The situation may be comparable to the way many consumers thought about wine several decades ago. At first people distinguished wines in terms of red and white wine, then in terms of rose and chablis, then in terms of California wines versus French wines, later by the kind of grape, and today some people select wines based on the estate. The focus groups suggested that the American tea market is still in the red versus white stage. One implication of this finding was that our labels and other communications needed to include some educational information about each tea, including health benefits, history and country of origin. Market Response — More important than our pre-market focus group is the market response to Honest Tea, i.e. sales. In the eighteen Fresh Fields/Whole Foods Markets of the mid-Atlantic region Honest Tea has become the best-selling bottled tea, outselling Snapple and the house brand. During the month of August, when Honest Tea was promotionally priced at 99 cents, 22,417 bottles of teas were sold, with several stores averaging more than 100 bottles per day. Perhaps more important than the numbers from one region are the thousands of responses we have gotten from our customers via unsolicited emails, letters, phone calls, and conversations at hundreds of sampling events. The feedback we have received make it clear that we have created something that was missing in the marketplace. Every week we receive several unsolicited emails and letters from customers. Typical comments include the following (see Exhibit A for more tea-mail): Subject: BEST TEA EVER! Dear Honest Tea, I have never bought a product that I thought was so fantastic that I felt the need to write about it. I love tea, but I always would brew it myself and cart it around because I can’t stand the syrupy-sweet “tea” that is sold most places. I saw your tea at Fresh Fields in Annapolis, MD. At first I was hesitant because I have it in my mind that all bottled iced teas = yucky sweet. But I was intrigued by the flavor choices and yes, the pretty bottles and bought one of each. Well, I went to my car and proceeded to drink all of them right then and there. The first one was so good and so different that I couldn’t help myself and had to try the rest. It actually tasted like tea! THEN… when I turned the bottle over and saw how few calories were in it I flipped! There is no reason not to drink this tea! You guys have truly done it, this is quality stuff! So keep it up and get this tea out there! I wish you success and happy brewing! -Cindy W., Annapolis, MD RE: Help! I need Honest Tea! Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 13 I just returned from a trip to Wash, DC (I live in Pittsburgh) and found that your tea is not available here. I love it and must have more. Can you ship it to me? Price is no object (to some degree). If you cannot ship it to me please advise me of any support groups or counseling that I may seek in order to recover from this lack of Honest Tea. I must warn you that I may get desperate, causing me to highjack an Honest Tea truck in the Washington area and bring it back to Pittsburgh. I am becoming a heartless, Honest Tea junkie. I hope that you can help. Thanks, EEOber Subject: Chai tea was great! I just came from my local Fresh Fields Market in Reston, VA after trying a bottle of your Kashmiri Chai tea. Fantastic! Imagine my surprise to learn the entire bottle was only 34 calories and 1/3 the caffeine of coffee! This is great stuff folks – my only complaint is that I can’t seem to find anywhere that sells it by the case. I don’t mind buying a couple bottles at a time for occasional consumption, but I would appreciate being able to purchase a case to bring to work and a case to keep at home. It would be a great way to replace soda and other sugary, high calorie drinks in my diet. Unfortunately, I cannot spare the time to stop at the store everyday to pick up a couple bottles. Any plans to sell by the case (hopefully at a slight discount)?? Colin C. Reston, VA Re: Honest Tea! Your tea is fabulous! I have never written a letter in support of a food product before, but ever since I stumbled across your Honest Tea last week at Fairway, I’ve been raving about it! At last, someone intelligent enough to realize that not all people like that syrupy junk that is on the market, and that nutri-sweet and artificial sweeteners taste like crap. I’ve grown so tired of “well, it’s what the consumers are demanding.” Not. The rest of us have spent the last decade or so brewing tea at home and keeping it in our refrigerators since traditional marketing researchers have been incapable of using their research to produce anything innovative. Bravo, bravo, bravo. Nice labels, too. Lisa P., New York City The response from grocery buyers at the corporate level has been equally as exciting. The new products buyer for Wild Oats/Alfalfa Community Market approved Honest Tea for sale in all of the chains 60+ stores. Here is her comment to the grocery buyers which she sent out on the Product Approval Form (see Exhibit B): Mark My Words: Honest Tea will be a success. The only bottled tea that is not loaded with sugars and tastes great. This is what people (like me) have been seeking for years. Too good to be true? No! I mean it now – BRING THESE IN! The natural foods buyer for Harris Teeter chose to carry the product in all 140 stores. Her buying committee told her this was the first innovation in the iced tea market they’d seen in about five years. Some even said that Honest Tea represents a new beverage category. Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 14 In addition to this feedback, Honest Tea has been presented with several promising opportunities to be plugged into several large supermarket chains. The status of these opportunities is as follows: Store # of outlets Region Status Penetration Albertson’s 96 Florida December decision Food Emporium 40 NY/NJ December decision Genuardi’s 32 NJ/PA/DE Approved for all stores Will go on sale in December ‘98 Giant 179 C/MD/VA/DE NJ/PA Approved On sale in flagship store Harris Teeter 140 NC/SC/GA/VA /KY/TN Approved for all stores On sale in all stores Shaw’s 127 New England Approved On sale in test market store Superfresh 78 NJ/PA Approved for all stores On sale in some stores Ukrop’s 40 VA Approved for all stores On sale in some stores Whole Foods 117 Nationwide Approved for midAtlantic and SE On sale in 20 stores Wild Oats/ Alfalfa’s 60 Nationwide Approved for all stores On sale in 12 stores In addition to success in the supermarket channel, Honest Tea is also being warmly received in food service and retail accounts. We have experienced strong repeat sales in cafeterias such as Bear Stearns, Lazard Freres and have just been approved for sale in the NFL corporate cafeteria. Honest Tea is the best-selling beverage at the Mangia gourmet eatery in Manhattan where it is priced at $2.50 a bottle. Honest Tea is also sold in wellknown restaurants such as Legal Sea Foods. Finally, we have also had strong repeat sales from food outlets on the campuses of Boston University, Harvard University, Yale University and Wellesley College. As with Snapple and other bottled iced teas, there does seem to be a seasonality affect to the sales of Honest Tea, particularly in the supermarket channel. However, as we expand our distribution to the Southern states and to more upscale cafeterias, we expect to see less of a dip in sales during the winter months. Marketing & Distribution Given the above market trends, target customer profile and record of success in the midAtlantic natural and specialty foods market, Honest Tea’s marketing and distribution strategy for 1999 is as follows: Honest Tea Business Plan – December 1998 15 1. National natural/specialty foods channels, working with brokers and distributors to achieve

BUY QUALITY ESSAYS
20% DISCOUNT TODAY
URGENT ESSAYS
IMPROVE YOUR GRADES
PROFESSIONAL WRITERS
PERSONALIZED SERVICES
ORIGINAL PAPERS
TIMELY DELIVERY